Data Dictionary: Census 2010
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Survey: Census 2010
Data Source: Census Bureau; Social Explorer
Table: PCT12H. Sex By Age (Hispanic Or Latino) [209]
Universe: People who are Hispanic or Latino
Table Details
PCT12H. Sex By Age (Hispanic Or Latino)
Universe: People who are Hispanic or Latino
Variable Label
PCT012H001
PCT012H002
PCT012H003
PCT012H004
PCT012H005
PCT012H006
PCT012H007
PCT012H008
PCT012H009
PCT012H010
PCT012H011
PCT012H012
PCT012H013
PCT012H014
PCT012H015
PCT012H016
PCT012H017
PCT012H018
PCT012H019
PCT012H020
PCT012H021
PCT012H022
PCT012H023
PCT012H024
PCT012H025
PCT012H026
PCT012H027
PCT012H028
PCT012H029
PCT012H030
PCT012H031
PCT012H032
PCT012H033
PCT012H034
PCT012H035
PCT012H036
PCT012H037
PCT012H038
PCT012H039
PCT012H040
PCT012H041
PCT012H042
PCT012H043
PCT012H044
PCT012H045
PCT012H046
PCT012H047
PCT012H048
PCT012H049
PCT012H050
PCT012H051
PCT012H052
PCT012H053
PCT012H054
PCT012H055
PCT012H056
PCT012H057
PCT012H058
PCT012H059
PCT012H060
PCT012H061
PCT012H062
PCT012H063
PCT012H064
PCT012H065
PCT012H066
PCT012H067
PCT012H068
PCT012H069
PCT012H070
PCT012H071
PCT012H072
PCT012H073
PCT012H074
PCT012H075
PCT012H076
PCT012H077
PCT012H078
PCT012H079
PCT012H080
PCT012H081
PCT012H082
PCT012H083
PCT012H084
PCT012H085
PCT012H086
PCT012H087
PCT012H088
PCT012H089
PCT012H090
PCT012H091
PCT012H092
PCT012H093
PCT012H094
PCT012H095
PCT012H096
PCT012H097
PCT012H098
PCT012H099
PCT012H100
PCT012H101
PCT012H102
PCT012H103
PCT012H104
PCT012H105
PCT012H106
PCT012H107
PCT012H108
PCT012H109
PCT012H110
PCT012H111
PCT012H112
PCT012H113
PCT012H114
PCT012H115
PCT012H116
PCT012H117
PCT012H118
PCT012H119
PCT012H120
PCT012H121
PCT012H122
PCT012H123
PCT012H124
PCT012H125
PCT012H126
PCT012H127
PCT012H128
PCT012H129
PCT012H130
PCT012H131
PCT012H132
PCT012H133
PCT012H134
PCT012H135
PCT012H136
PCT012H137
PCT012H138
PCT012H139
PCT012H140
PCT012H141
PCT012H142
PCT012H143
PCT012H144
PCT012H145
PCT012H146
PCT012H147
PCT012H148
PCT012H149
PCT012H150
PCT012H151
PCT012H152
PCT012H153
PCT012H154
PCT012H155
PCT012H156
PCT012H157
PCT012H158
PCT012H159
PCT012H160
PCT012H161
PCT012H162
PCT012H163
PCT012H164
PCT012H165
PCT012H166
PCT012H167
PCT012H168
PCT012H169
PCT012H170
PCT012H171
PCT012H172
PCT012H173
PCT012H174
PCT012H175
PCT012H176
PCT012H177
PCT012H178
PCT012H179
PCT012H180
PCT012H181
PCT012H182
PCT012H183
PCT012H184
PCT012H185
PCT012H186
PCT012H187
PCT012H188
PCT012H189
PCT012H190
PCT012H191
PCT012H192
PCT012H193
PCT012H194
PCT012H195
PCT012H196
PCT012H197
PCT012H198
PCT012H199
PCT012H200
PCT012H201
PCT012H202
PCT012H203
PCT012H204
PCT012H205
PCT012H206
PCT012H207
PCT012H208
PCT012H209
Notes:
Source: 2000 SF1 PCT12H.
Relevant Documentation:
Excerpt from: Social Explorer, U.S. Census Bureau; 2010 Census of Population and Housing, Summary File 1: Technical Documentation, Issued June 2011.
 
Sex
Individuals were asked to mark either "male&quot or "female" to indicate their sex. For most cases in which sex was not reported, the appropriate entry was determined from the persons given (i.e., first) name and household relationship. Otherwise, sex was allocated according to the relationship to the householder and the age of the person. (For more information on allocation, see "2010 Census: Operational Overview and Accuracy of the Data.")


Sex Ratio
The sex ratio represents the balance between the male and female populations. Ratios above 100 indicate a larger male population, and ratios below 100 indicate a larger female population. This measure is derived by dividing the total number of males by the total number of females and then multiplying by 100. It is rounded to the nearest tenth.

Comparability
A question on the sex of individuals has been asked of the total population in every census.

Excerpt from: Social Explorer, U.S. Census Bureau; 2010 Census of Population and Housing, Summary File 1: Technical Documentation, Issued June 2011.
 
Age
The data on age were derived from answers to a two-part question (i.e., age and date of birth). The age classification for a person in census tabulations is the age of the person in completed years as of April 1, 2010, the census reference date. Both age and date of birth responses are used in combination to
determine the most accurate age for the person as of the census reference date. Inconsistently reported and missing values are assigned or allocated based on the values of other variables for that person, from other people in the household or from people in other households (i.e., hot-deck imputation).
Age data are tabulated in age groupings and single years of age. Data on age also are used to classify other characteristics in census tabulations.


Median Age
This measure divides the age distribution into two equal parts: one-half of the cases falling below the median value and one-half above the value. Median age is computed on the basis of a single-year-of-age distribution using a linear interpolation method.

Limitation of the data
There is some tendency for respondents to provide their age as of the date they completed the census questionnaire or interview, not their age as of the census reference date. The two-part question and editing procedures have attempted to minimize the effect of this reporting problem on tabulations. Additionally, the current census age question displays the census reference date prominently, and interviewer training emphasizes the importance of collecting age as of the reference date.

Respondents sometimes round a persons age up if they were close to having a birthday. For most single years of age, the misstatements are largely offsetting. The problem is most pronounced at age 0. Also, there may have been more rounding up to age 1 to avoid reporting age as 0 years. (Age in completed months was not collected for infants under age 1.) Editing procedures correct this problem.

There is some respondent resistance to reporting the ages of babies in completed years (i.e., 0 years old when the baby is under 1 year old). Instead, babies ages are sometimes reported in months. The two-part question along with enhanced editing and data capture procedures correct much of this problem before the age data are finalized in tabulations. Additionally, the current census age question includes an instruction for babies ages to be answered as 0 years old when they are under 1 year old.

Age heaping is a common age misreporting error. Age heaping is the tendency for people to overreport ages (or years of birth) that end in certain digits (commonly digits 0 or 5) and underreport ages or years of birth ending in other digits. The two-part question helps minimize the effect of age heaping on the final tabulations.

Age data for centenarians have a history of data quality challenges. The counts in the 1970 and 1980 Censuses for people 100 years and over were substantially overstated. Editing and data collection methods have been enhanced in order to meet the data quality challenges for this population.

It also has been documented that the population aged 69 in the 1970 Census and the population aged 79 in the 1980 Census were overstated. The population aged 89 in 1990 and the population aged 99 in 2000 did not have an overstated count. (For more information on the design of the age question, see the Comparability section below.)

Comparability
Age data have been collected in every census. However, there have been some differences in the way they have been collected and processed over time. In the 2010 Census (as in Census 2000), each individual provided both an age and an exact date of birth. The 1990 Census collected age and year of birth. Prior censuses had collected month and quarter of birth in addition to age and year of birth. The 1990 Census change was made so that coded information could be obtained for both age and year of birth.

In each census since 1940, the age of a person was assigned when it was not reported. In censuses before 1940, with the exception of 1880, people of unknown age were shown as a separate category. Since 1960, assignment of unknown age has been performed by a general procedure described as imputation. The specific procedures for imputing age have been different in each census. (For more information on imputation, see 2010 Census: Operational Overview and Accuracy of the Data.)

Excerpt from: Social Explorer, U.S. Census Bureau; 2010 Census of Population and Housing, Summary File 1: Technical Documentation, Issued June 2011.
 
Hispanic or Latino Origin
The data on the Hispanic or Latino population were derived from answers to a question that was asked of all people. The terms Hispanic,Latino, and Spanish are used interchangeably. Some respondents identify with all three terms, while others may identify with only one of these three specific terms. People who identify with the terms Hispanic,Latino, or Spanish are those who classify themselves in one of the specific Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish categories listed on the questionnaire (Mexican,Puerto Rican, or Cuban) as well as those who indicate that they are another Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish origin. People who do not identify with one of the specific origins listed on the questionnaire but indicate that they are another Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish origin are those whose origins are from Spain, the Spanish-speaking countries of Central or South America, or the Dominican Republic. Up to two write-in responses to the another Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish origin category are coded.

Origin can be viewed as the heritage, nationality group, lineage, or country of birth of the person or the persons parents or ancestors before their arrival in the United States. People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be any race.

Some tabulations are shown by the origin of the householder. In all cases where the origin of households, families, or occupied housing units is classified as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish, the origin of the householder is used. (See the discussion of householder under "Household Type and Relationship.")

If an individual did not provide a Hispanic origin response, his or her origin was allocated using specific rules of precedence of household relationship. For example, if origin was missing for a natural-born child in the household, then either the origin of the householder, another natural-born child, or spouse of the householder was allocated.
If Hispanic origin was not reported for anyone in the household and origin could not be obtained from a response to the race question, then their origin was assigned based on their prior census record (either from Census 2000 or the American Community Survey), if available. If not, then the Hispanic origin of a householder in a previously processed household with the same race was allocated. (For more information on allocation, see "2010 Census: Operational Overview and Accuracy of the Data.") As in Census 2000, surnames (Spanish and non-Spanish) were used to assist in allocating an origin or race.

Comparability
There are four changes to the Hispanic origin question for the 2010 Census. First, the wording of the question differs from that in 2000. In 2000, the question asked if the person was Spanish/Hispanic/Latino. In 2010, the question asks if the person is of Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish origin. Second, in 2000, the question provided an instruction, Mark ý the 'No'box if not Spanish/Hispanic/Latino. The 2010 Census question provided no specific instruction for non-Hispanics. Third, in 2010, the Yes, another Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish origin category provided examples of six Hispanic origin groups (Argentinean, Colombian, Dominican, Nicaraguan, Salvadoran, Spaniard, and so on) and instructed respondents to print origin. In 2000, no Hispanic origin examples were given. Finally, the fourth change was the addition of a new instruction in the 2010 Census that was not used in Census 2000. The instruction is stated as follows: NOTE: Please answer BOTH Question 8 about Hispanic origin and Question 9 about race. For this census, Hispanic origins are not races.

There were two changes to the Hispanic origin question for Census 2000. First, the sequence of the race and Hispanic origin questions for Census 2000 differs from that in 1990; in 1990, the race question preceded the Hispanic origin question. Testing prior to Census 2000 indicated that response to the Hispanic origin question could be improved by placing it before the race question without affecting the response to the race question. Second, there was an instruction preceding the Hispanic origin question indicating that respondents should answer both the Hispanic origin and the race questions. This instruction was added to give emphasis to the distinct concepts of the Hispanic origin and race questions, and emphasized the need for both pieces of information.

Furthermore, there was a change in the processing of the Hispanic origin and race responses. In the 1990 census, respondents provided Hispanic origin responses in the race question and race responses in the Hispanic origin question. In 1990, the Hispanic origin question and the race question had separate edits; therefore, although information may have been present on the questionnaire, it was not fully utilized due to the discrete nature of the edits. However, for Census 2000, there was a joint race and Hispanic origin edit that utilized Hispanic origin and race information regardless of the location.