Data Dictionary: Census 2000
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Survey: Census 2000
Data Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Table: PCT71F. Sex by Work Status in 1999 by Usual Hrs Worked per Week by Weeks Worked for the Pop. 16+ Years (Some Other Race Alone) [49]
Universe: Some other race alone population 16 years and over
Table Details
PCT71F. Sex by Work Status in 1999 by Usual Hrs Worked per Week by Weeks Worked for the Pop. 16+ Years (Some Other Race Alone)
Universe: Some other race alone population 16 years and over
Variable Label
PCT071F001
PCT071F002
PCT071F003
PCT071F004
PCT071F005
PCT071F006
PCT071F007
PCT071F008
PCT071F009
PCT071F010
PCT071F011
PCT071F012
PCT071F013
PCT071F014
PCT071F015
PCT071F016
PCT071F017
PCT071F018
PCT071F019
PCT071F020
PCT071F021
PCT071F022
PCT071F023
PCT071F024
PCT071F025
PCT071F026
PCT071F027
PCT071F028
PCT071F029
PCT071F030
PCT071F031
PCT071F032
PCT071F033
PCT071F034
PCT071F035
PCT071F036
PCT071F037
PCT071F038
PCT071F039
PCT071F040
PCT071F041
PCT071F042
PCT071F043
PCT071F044
PCT071F045
PCT071F046
PCT071F047
PCT071F048
PCT071F049
Relevant Documentation:
Excerpt from: Social Explorer, U.S. Census Bureau; 2000 Census of Population and Housing, Summary File 3: Technical Documentation, 2002.
 
Sex
The data on sex, which was asked of all people, were derived from answers to long-form questionnaire Item 3 and short-form questionnaire Item 5. Individuals were asked to mark either "male" or "female" to indicate their sex. For most cases in which sex was not reported, it was determined from the persons given (i.e., first) name and household relationship. Otherwise, sex was imputed according to the relationship to the householder and the age of the person. (For more information on imputation, see "Accuracy of the Data.")

Sex ratio
A measure derived by dividing the total number of males by the total number of females, and then multiplying by 100. This measure is rounded to the nearest tenth.

Comparability
A question on the sex of individuals has been included in every census. Census 2000 was the first time that first name was used for imputation of cases where sex was not reported.

Excerpt from: Social Explorer, U.S. Census Bureau; 2000 Census of Population and Housing, Summary File 3: Technical Documentation, 2002.
 
Work Status in 1999
The data on work status in 1999 were derived from answers to long-form questionnaire Item 30a, which was asked of a sample of the population 15 years old and over. People 16 years old and over who worked 1 or more weeks according to the criteria described below are classified as "Worked in 1999." All other people 16 years old and over are classified as "Did not work in 1999." Some earnings tabulations showing work status in 1999 include 15 year olds; these people, by definition, are classified as "Did not work in 1999."

Weeks worked in 1999
The data on weeks worked in 1999 were derived from answers to long-form questionnaire Item 30b, which was asked of people 15 years old and over who indicated in long-form questionnaire Item 30a that they worked in 1999. The data were tabulated for people 16 years old and over and pertain to the number of weeks during 1999 in which a person did any work for pay or profit (or took paid vacation or paid sick leave) or worked without pay on a family farm or in a family business. Weeks on active duty in the armed forces also are included as weeks worked.

Median weeks worked in 1999
Median weeks worked in 1999 divides the weeks worked distribution into two equal parts: one-half of the cases falling below the median weeks worked and one-half above the median. Median weeks worked in 1999 is computed on the basis of a standard distribution (see the "Standard Distributions" section under "Derived Measures"). Median weeks worked is rounded to the nearest whole number. (For more information on medians, see "Derived Measures".)

Usual hours worked per week in 1999
The data on usual hours worked in 1999 were derived from answers to long-form questionnaire Item 30c. This question was asked of people 15 years old and over who indicated that they worked in 1999 in Question 30a, and the data are tabulated for people 16 years old and over. The respondent was asked to report the number of hours usually worked during the weeks worked in 1999. If their hours varied considerably from week to week during 1999, the respondent was asked to report an approximate average of the hours worked each week. People 16 years old and over who reported that they usually worked 35 or more hours each week are classified as "Usually worked full time"; people who reported that they usually worked 1 to 34 hours each week are classified as "Usually worked part time."

Median usual hours worked per week in 1999
Median usual hours worked per week in 1999 divides the usual hours worked distribution into two equal parts: one-half of the cases falling below the median usual hours worked and one-half above the median. Median usual hours worked per week in 1999 is computed on the basis of a standard distribution (see the "Standard Distributions" section under "Derived Measures"). Median usual hours worked per week is rounded to the nearest whole hour. (For more information on medians, see "Derived Measures".)

Aggregate usual hours worked per week in 1999
The aggregate usual hours worked per week in 1999 is the number obtained by summing across the usual hours worked values of all people who worked in 1999. (Note that there is one usual hours value for each worker, so the number of items summed equals the number of workers.)

Mean usual hours worked per week in 1999
Mean usual hours worked per week is calculated by dividing the aggregate number of usual hours worked per week worked in 1999 by the total number of people who worked in 1999. Mean usual hours worked per week is rounded to the nearest tenth. (For more information on means, see "Derived Measures".)

Full-time, year-round workers
'Full-time, year-round workers' consists of people 16 years old and over who usually worked 35 hours or more per week for 50 to 52 weeks in 1999. The term "worker" in these concepts refers to people classified as Worked in 1999 as defined above. The term worked in these concepts means "worked one or more weeks in 1999" as defined above under "Weeks Worked in 1999."

Limitation of the data
It is probable that data on the number of people who worked in 1999 and on the number of weeks worked are understated since there was probably a tendency for respondents to forget intermittent or short periods of employment or to exclude weeks worked without pay. There may also have been a tendency for people not to include weeks of paid vacation among their weeks worked, which would result in an underestimate of the number of people who worked "50 to 52 weeks."

Comparability
The data on weeks worked collected in Census 2000 are comparable with data from the 1960 to 1990 censuses, but may not be entirely comparable with data from the 1940 and 1950 censuses. Starting with the 1960 census, two separate questions have been used to obtain this information. The first identifies people with any work experience during the year and, thus, indicates those people for whom the question about number of weeks worked applies. In 1940 and 1950, the questionnaires contained only a single question on number of weeks worked. In 1970, people responded to the question on weeks worked by indicating one of six weeks-worked intervals. In 1980 and 1990, people were asked to enter the specific number of weeks they worked.

Worker
The terms "worker" and "work" appear in connection with several subjects: employment status, journey-to-work, class of worker, and work status in 1999. Their meaning varies and, therefore, should be determined by referring to the definition of the subject in which they appear. When used in the concepts "Workers in Family," "Workers in Family in 1999," and "Full-Time, Year-Round Workers," the term "worker" relates to the meaning of work defined for the "Work Status in 1999" subject.

Excerpt from: Social Explorer, U.S. Census Bureau; 2000 Census of Population and Housing, Summary File 3: Technical Documentation, 2002.
 
Usual hours worked per week in 1999
The data on usual hours worked in 1999 were derived from answers to long-form questionnaire Item 30c. This question was asked of people 15 years old and over who indicated that they worked in 1999 in Question 30a, and the data are tabulated for people 16 years old and over. The respondent was asked to report the number of hours usually worked during the weeks worked in 1999. If their hours varied considerably from week to week during 1999, the respondent was asked to report an approximate average of the hours worked each week. People 16 years old and over who reported that they usually worked 35 or more hours each week are classified as "Usually worked full time"; people who reported that they usually worked 1 to 34 hours each week are classified as "Usually worked part time."

Excerpt from: Social Explorer, U.S. Census Bureau; 2000 Census of Population and Housing, Summary File 3: Technical Documentation, 2002.
 
Weeks worked in 1999
The data on weeks worked in 1999 were derived from answers to long-form questionnaire Item 30b, which was asked of people 15 years old and over who indicated in long-form questionnaire Item 30a that they worked in 1999. The data were tabulated for people 16 years old and over and pertain to the number of weeks during 1999 in which a person did any work for pay or profit (or took paid vacation or paid sick leave) or worked without pay on a family farm or in a family business. Weeks on active duty in the armed forces also are included as weeks worked.

Excerpt from: Social Explorer, U.S. Census Bureau; 2000 Census of Population and Housing, Summary File 3: Technical Documentation, 2002.
 
Some other race
This category includes all other responses not included in the "White," "Black or African American," "American Indian or Alaska Native," "Asian," and "Native Hawaiian" or "Other Pacific Islander" race categories described above. Respondents providing write-in entries such as multiracial, mixed, interracial, or a Hispanic/Latino group (for example, Mexican, Puerto Rican, or Cuban) in the "Some other race" write-in space are included in this category.