Data Dictionary: Census 2000
you are here: choose a survey survey data set table details
Survey: Census 2000
Data Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Table: HCT6. Tenure By Year Structure Built By Units In Structure [147]
Universe: Occupied housing units
Table Details
HCT6. Tenure By Year Structure Built By Units In Structure
Universe: Occupied housing units
Variable Label
HCT006001
HCT006002
HCT006003
HCT006004
HCT006005
HCT006006
HCT006007
HCT006008
HCT006009
HCT006010
HCT006011
HCT006012
HCT006013
HCT006014
HCT006015
HCT006016
HCT006017
HCT006018
HCT006019
HCT006020
HCT006021
HCT006022
HCT006023
HCT006024
HCT006025
HCT006026
HCT006027
HCT006028
HCT006029
HCT006030
HCT006031
HCT006032
HCT006033
HCT006034
HCT006035
HCT006036
HCT006037
HCT006038
HCT006039
HCT006040
HCT006041
HCT006042
HCT006043
HCT006044
HCT006045
HCT006046
HCT006047
HCT006048
HCT006049
HCT006050
HCT006051
HCT006052
HCT006053
HCT006054
HCT006055
HCT006056
HCT006057
HCT006058
HCT006059
HCT006060
HCT006061
HCT006062
HCT006063
HCT006064
HCT006065
HCT006066
HCT006067
HCT006068
HCT006069
HCT006070
HCT006071
HCT006072
HCT006073
HCT006074
HCT006075
HCT006076
HCT006077
HCT006078
HCT006079
HCT006080
HCT006081
HCT006082
HCT006083
HCT006084
HCT006085
HCT006086
HCT006087
HCT006088
HCT006089
HCT006090
HCT006091
HCT006092
HCT006093
HCT006094
HCT006095
HCT006096
HCT006097
HCT006098
HCT006099
HCT006100
HCT006101
HCT006102
HCT006103
HCT006104
HCT006105
HCT006106
HCT006107
HCT006108
HCT006109
HCT006110
HCT006111
HCT006112
HCT006113
HCT006114
HCT006115
HCT006116
HCT006117
HCT006118
HCT006119
HCT006120
HCT006121
HCT006122
HCT006123
HCT006124
HCT006125
HCT006126
HCT006127
HCT006128
HCT006129
HCT006130
HCT006131
HCT006132
HCT006133
HCT006134
HCT006135
HCT006136
HCT006137
HCT006138
HCT006139
HCT006140
HCT006141
HCT006142
HCT006143
HCT006144
HCT006145
HCT006146
HCT006147
Relevant Documentation:
Excerpt from: Social Explorer, U.S. Census Bureau; 2000 Census of Population and Housing, Summary File 3: Technical Documentation, 2002.
 
Tenure
The data on tenure, which was asked at all occupied housing units, were obtained from answers to long-form questionnaire Item 33 and short-form questionnaire Item 2. All occupied housing units are classified as either owner occupied or renter occupied.

Owner occupied
A housing unit is owner occupied if the owner or co-owner lives in the unit even if it is mortgaged or not fully paid for. The owner or co-owner must live in the unit and usually is Person 1 on the questionnaire. The unit is "Owned by you or someone in this household with a mortgage or loan" if it is being purchased with a mortgage or some other debt arrangement, such as a deed of trust, trust deed, contract to purchase, land contract, or purchase agreement. The unit is also considered owned with a mortgage if it is built on leased land and there is a mortgage on the unit. Mobile homes occupied by owners with installment loans balances are also included in this category.

A housing unit is "Owned by you or someone in this household free and clear (without a mortgage or loan)" if there is no mortgage or other similar debt on the house, apartment, or mobile home including units built on leased land if the unit is owned outright without a mortgage.

The tenure item on the Census 2000 questionnaire distinguishes between units owned with a mortgage or loan and those owned free and clear. In the sample data products, as in the 100-percent products, the tenure item provides data for total owner-occupied units. Detailed information that identifies mortgaged and nonmortgaged units are provided in other sample housing matrices. (For more information, see discussion under "Mortgage Status," "Selected Monthly Owner Costs," and "Selected Monthly Owner Costs as a Percentage of Household Income in 1999.")

Renter occupied
All occupied housing units that are not owner occupied, whether they are rented for cash rent or occupied without payment of cash rent, are classified as renter occupied. "No cash rent" units are separately identified in the rent tabulations. Such units are generally provided free by friends or relatives or in exchange for services, such as resident manager, caretaker, minister, or tenant farmer. Housing units on military bases also are classified in the "No cash rent" category. "Rented for cash rent" includes units in continuing care, sometimes called life care arrangements. These arrangements usually involve a contract between one or more individuals and a service provider guaranteeing the individual shelter, usually a house or apartment, and services, such as meals or transportation to shopping or recreation. (For more information, see "Meals Included in Rent.")

Comparability
Data on tenure have been collected since 1890. For 1990, the response categories were expanded to allow the respondent to report whether the unit was owned with a mortgage or loan, or free and clear (without a mortgage). The distinction between units owned with a mortgage and units owned free and clear was added in 1990 to improve the count of owner-occupied units. Research after the 1980 census indicated some respondents did not consider their units owned if they had a mortgage. In Census 2000, we continued with the same tenure categories used in the 1990 census.

Excerpt from: Social Explorer, U.S. Census Bureau; 2000 Census of Population and Housing, Summary File 3: Technical Documentation, 2002.
 
Year Structure Built
The data on year structure built were obtained from answers to long-form questionnaire Item 35, which was asked on a sample basis at both occupied and vacant housing units. Year structure built refers to when the building was first constructed, not when it was remodeled, added to, or converted. For housing units under construction that met the housing unit definition-that is, all exterior windows, doors, and final usable floors were in place-the category "1999 or 2000" was used for tabulations. For mobile homes, houseboats, RVs, etc., the manufacturers model year was assumed to be the year built. The data relate to the number of units built during the specified periods that were still in existence at the time of enumeration.

Median year structure built
Median year structure built divides the distribution into two equal parts: one-half of the cases falling below the median year structure built and one-half above the median. Median year structure built is computed on the basis of a standard distribution (see the "Standard Distributions" section under "Derived Measures"). Median year structure built is rounded to the nearest whole number. Median age of housing can be obtained by subtracting median year structure built from 2000. For example, if the median year structure built is 1967, the median age of housing in that area is 33 years (2000 minus 1967). (For more information on medians, see "Derived Measures".)

Limitation of the data
Data on year structure built are more susceptible to errors of response and nonreporting than data on many other items because respondents must rely on their memory or on estimates by people who have lived in the neighborhood a long time.

Comparability
Data on year structure built were collected for the first time in the 1940 census. Since then, the response categories have been modified to accommodate the 10-year period between each census. In the 1980 census, the number of units built before 1940 appeared to be underreported. In an effort to alleviate this problem, a "Don't know" category was added in 1990. Responses of "Don't know" were treated like blanks and the item was allocated from similar units by tenure and structure type. However, this led to an extremely high allocation rate for the item (28 percent). A 1996 test proved inconclusive in determining whether a "Don't know" category led to a more accurate count of older units, but the test showed the allocation rate for this item was greatly reduced by the elimination of the "Don't know" category. As a result, "Don't know" was deleted for Census 2000.
Excerpt from: Social Explorer, U.S. Census Bureau; 2000 Census of Population and Housing, Summary File 3: Technical Documentation, 2002.
 
Units in Structure
The data on units in structure (also referred to as "type of structure") were obtained from answers to long-form questionnaire Item 34, which was asked on a sample basis at both occupied and vacant housing units. A structure is a separate building that either has open spaces on all sides or is separated from other structures by dividing walls that extend from ground to roof. In determining the number of units in a structure, all housing units, both occupied and vacant, are counted. Stores and office space are excluded. The statistics are presented for the number of housing units in structures of specified type and size, not for the number of residential buildings.

1-unit, detached
This is a 1-unit structure detached from any other house; that is, with open space on all four sides. Such structures are considered detached even if they have an adjoining shed or garage. A 1-family house that contains a business is considered detached as long as the building has open space on all four sides. Mobile homes to which one or more permanent rooms have been added or built also are included.

1-unit, attached
This is a 1-unit structure that has one or more walls extending from ground to roof separating it from adjoining structures. In row houses (sometimes called townhouses), double houses, or houses attached to nonresidential structures, each house is a separate, attached structure if the dividing or common wall goes from ground to roof.

2 or more units
These are units in structures containing 2 or more housing units, further categorized as units in structures with 2, 3 or 4, 5 to 9, 10 to 19, 20 to 49, and 50 or more units.

Mobile home
Both occupied and vacant mobile homes to which no permanent rooms have been added are counted in this category. Mobile homes used only for business purposes or for extra sleeping space and mobile homes for sale on a dealers lot, at the factory, or in storage are not counted in the housing inventory. In 1990, the category was "mobile home or trailer."

Boat, RV, van, etc
This category is for any living quarters occupied as a housing unit that does not fit in the previous categories. Examples that fit in this category are houseboats, railroad cars, campers, and vans.

Comparability
Data on units in structure have been collected since 1940 and on mobile homes and trailers since 1950. In 1970 and 1980, these data were shown only for year-round housing units. A category of "other" was used in 1990, but this category was greatly overstated. It was replaced by "Boat, RV, van, etc." in Census 2000. A similar category, "Boat, tent, van, etc." was used in 1980. In Census 2000, this question was asked on a sample basis. In 1990 and prior to 1980, the unit in structure question was asked on a 100-percent basis. In 1980, data on units at address were collected on a 100-percent basis and data on units in structure were collected on a sample basis. The 1980 data on "units at address" should not be used a proxy for "units in structure" because some multiunit buildings had more than one street address.