Data Dictionary: Census 1980
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Survey: Census 1980
Data Source: U.S. Census Bureau and Social Explorer
Table: T72. Households With All Other Types Of Income [3]
Universe: Households
Table Details
T72. Households With All Other Types Of Income
Universe: Households
Variable Label
T072_001
T072_002
T072_003
Relevant Documentation:
Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; Census of Population and Housing, 1980: Summary Tape File 3 [machine-readable data file] / conducted By the U.S. Bureau of the Census. Washington: Bureau of the Census [producer and distributor], 1982.
 
Household
The person or persons occupying a housing unit. Counts of households, householders, and occupied-housing units are always identical in complete-count tabulations. In sample tables, the numbers may not always be the same because of differences in weighting sample data.

See also: "Household Relationship;" "Household Type;" "Housing Unit".

Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; Census of Population and Housing, 1980: Summary Tape File 3 [machine-readable data file] / conducted By the U.S. Bureau of the Census. Washington: Bureau of the Census [producer and distributor], 1982.
 
Income from all other sources
Money income received from sources such as veteran's payments; public or private pensions; periodic receipts from insurance policies or annuities; unemployment insurance benefits; workmen's compensation cash benefits; periodic payments from estates and trust funds; alimony or child support from persons who are not members of the household; receipts for foster child care; net gambling gains; nonservice scholarships and fellowships; and money received for transportation and/or subsistence by persons participating in special governmental training programs. e.g., under the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act or Work Incentive Program; and periodic contributions from persons outside the household, e.g., voluntary allotment checks sent by Armed Forces personnel to relatives not living with them.

In most reports, data on income type are limited to (1) the number of households or families with income of a specified type and (2) the mean income of the specified type for the applicable households or families (i.e., aggregate income of the specified type received by persons in households or families divided by the number of households or families with that type of income). In income type tabulations, a household or family may be counted more than once, i.e. for each type of income received, although the dollar amounts of income are counted only once. In one detailed tabulation in PC80-l-D, frequency counts are provided for income intervals as well as a mean for each type. Further, mean total income is provided in addition to mean income of specified type for households, families, and unrelated individuals with income of the specified type. The ratio of those two means will suggest the degree to which, for instance, families receiving Social Security income may also have other major sources of income.

Census basic records show income in $10 intervals for each type of income up to $100,000, except that amounts of $10,000 or more are coded as $9,995 for Social Security or public assistance income. Income amounts of $100,000 to $999,000 are recorded in $1.000 intervals. Income amounts of $l, 000,000 or more are recorded as $999,500. Net losses up to $10,000 are recorded in $10 intervals for nonfarm or farm self-employment income and interest, dividend and net rental income but are not allowed for other income types. Losses of $10,000 or more are coded as $-9995. High incomes of each type are grouped together on public-use microdata, with "$75,000 or more" as a single category, to avoid the identification of individuals.