Data Dictionary: ACS 2010 (1-Year Estimates)
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Data Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Table: B25090. Mortgage Status By Aggregate Real Estate Taxes Paid (Dollars) [3]
Universe: Universe: Owner-occupied housing units
Table Details
B25090. Mortgage Status By Aggregate Real Estate Taxes Paid (Dollars)
Universe: Universe: Owner-occupied housing units
Relevant Documentation:
Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; American Community Survey 2010 Summary File: Technical Documentation.
 
Mortgage Status
The data on mortgage status were obtained from Housing Questions 19a and 20a in the 2010 American Community Survey. The questions were asked at owner-occupied units.

"Mortgage" refers to all forms of debt where the property is pledged as security for repayment of the debt, including deeds of trust; trust deeds; contracts to purchase; land contracts; junior mortgages; and home equity loans.

A mortgage is considered a first mortgage if it has prior claim over any other mortgage or if it is the only mortgage on the property. All other mortgages (second, third, etc.) are considered junior mortgages. A home equity loan is generally a junior mortgage. If no first mortgage is reported, but a junior mortgage or home equity loan is reported, then the loan is considered a first mortgage.

In most data products, the tabulations for "Selected Monthly Owner Costs" and "Selected Monthly Owner Costs as a Percentage of Household Income" usually are shown separately for units "with a mortgage" and for units "not mortgaged." The category "not mortgaged" is comprised of housing units owned free and clear of debt.

Mortgage status provides information on the cost of home ownership. When the data is used in conjunction with mortgage payment data, the information determines shelter costs for living quarters. These data can be use in the development of housing programs aimed to meet the needs of people at different economic levels. The data also serve to evaluate the magnitude of and to plan facilities for condominiums, which are becoming an important source of supply of new housing in many areas.

Question/Concept History
Since 1996, the American Community Survey questions have been the same.

Comparability
Data on mortgage status in the American Community Survey can be compared to previous ACS and Census 2000 mortgage status data. For Census 2000, tables for both total owner-occupied housing units and specified owner-occupied housing units were released, thus comparisons can be made only when comparing the same universes between the two data sets.
Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; American Community Survey 2010 Summary File: Technical Documentation.
 
Aggregate
An aggregate is the sum of the values for each of the elements in the universe. For example, aggregate household income is the sum of the incomes of all households in a given geographic area. Means are derived by dividing the aggregate by the appropriate universe. When an aggregate used as a numerator is rounded in the detailed (base) tables, the rounded value is used for the calculation of the mean.

Rounding for selected aggregates
To protect the confidentiality of responses, the aggregates shown in matrices for the list of subjects below are rounded. This means that the aggregates for these subjects, except for travel time to work, are rounded to the nearest hundred dollars. Unless special rounding rules apply (see below); $150 rounds up to $200; $149 rounds down to $100. Note that each cell in a matrix is rounded individually. This means that an aggregate value shown for the United States may not necessarily be the sum total of the aggregate values in the matrices for the states. This also means that the cells in the aggregate matrices may not add to the total and/or subtotal lines.

Special rounding rules for aggregates
-If the dollar value is between -$100 and +$100, then the dollar value is rounded to $0.
-If the dollar value is less than -$100, then the dollar value is rounded to the nearest -$100.
Aggregates Subject to Rounding
Contract Rent, Rent Asked

Earnings in the Past 12 Months (Households)

Earnings in the Past 12 Months (Individuals)
Gross Rent*

Income Deficit in the Past 12 Months (Families)

Income Deficit in the Past 12 Months Per Family Member

Income Deficit in the Past 12 Months Per Unrelated Individual

Income in the Past 12 Months (Household/Family/Nonfamily Household)

Income in the Past 12 Months (Individuals)

Mobile Home Costs

Real Estate Taxes (Per $1,000 Value)

Rent Asked

Selected Monthly Owner Costs* by Mortgage Status

Total Mortgage Payment

Travel Time to Work**

Type of Income in the Past 12 Months (Households)

Value, Price Asked

[*Note: Gross Rent and Selected Monthly Owner Costs include other aggregates that also are subject to rounding. For example, Gross Rent includes aggregates of payments for "contract rent" and the "costs of utilities and fuels." Selected Monthly Owner Costs includes aggregates of payments for "mortgages, deeds of trust, contracts to purchase, or similar debts on the property (including payments for the first mortgage, second mortgage, home equity loans, and other junior mortgages); real estate taxes; fire, hazard, and flood insurance on the property, and the costs of utilities and fuels."]

[**Note: Aggregate Travel Time to Work is zero if the aggregate is zero, is rounded to 4 minutes if the aggregate is 1 to 7 minutes, and is rounded to the nearest multiple of 5 minutes for all other values (if the aggregate is not already evenly divisible by 5).]

Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; American Community Survey 2010 Summary File: Technical Documentation.
 
Real Estate Taxes
The data on real estate taxes were obtained from Housing Question 17 in the 2010 American Community Survey. The question was asked at owner-occupied units. The statistics from this question refer to the total amount of all real estate taxes on the entire property (land and buildings) payable to all taxing jurisdictions, including special assessments, school taxes, county taxes, and so forth.

Real estate taxes include state, local, and all other real estate taxes even if delinquent, unpaid, or paid by someone who is not a member of the household. However, taxes due from prior years are not included. If taxes are paid on other than a yearly basis, the payments are converted to a yearly basis.

The payment for real estate taxes is added to payments for fire, hazard, and flood insurance; utilities and fuels; and mortgages (both first and second mortgages, home equity loans, and other junior mortgages) to derive "Selected Monthly Owner Costs" and "Selected Monthly Owner Costs as a Percentage of Household Income." These data provide information on the cost of home ownership and offer an excellent measure of housing affordability and excessive shelter costs.
A separate question (Question 19c in the 2008 American Community Survey) determines whether real estate taxes are included in the mortgage payment to the lender(s). This makes it possible to avoid counting taxes twice in the computations.
Question/Concept History
Since 1996, the American Community Survey questions have been the same.
Comparability
Data on real estate taxes in the American Community Survey should not be compared to Census 2000 real estate taxes data. The universe in Census 2000 was "specified owner-occupied housing units" whereas the universe in the ACS is "owner occupied housing units," thus comparisons cannot be made between these two data sets.