Data Dictionary: Census 2010
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Survey: Census 2010
Data Source: Census Bureau; Social Explorer
Table: PCT14E. Presence Of Multigenerational Households (Native Hawaiian And Other Pacific Islander Alone Householder) [3]
Universe: Households with a householder who is Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone
Table Details
PCT14E. Presence Of Multigenerational Households (Native Hawaiian And Other Pacific Islander Alone Householder)
Universe: Households with a householder who is Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone
Notes:
Source: NEW table: Universe = 2000 SF1 P15E.
Relevant Documentation:
Excerpt from: Social Explorer, U.S. Census Bureau; 2010 Census of Population and Housing, Summary File 1: Technical Documentation, Issued June 2011.
 
Multigenerational Household
A multigenerational household is one that contains three or more parent-child generations; for example, the householder, child of householder (either biological, stepchild, or adopted child), and grandchildren of householder. A householder with a parent or parent-in-law of the householder and a child of the householder may also be a multigenerational household.

Excerpt from: Social Explorer, U.S. Census Bureau; 2010 Census of Population and Housing, Summary File 1: Technical Documentation, Issued June 2011.
 
Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander
A person having origins in any of the original peoples of Hawaii, Guam, Samoa, or other Pacific Islands. It includes people who indicate their race as Native Hawaiian,Guamanian or Chamorro,Samoan, and Other Pacific Islander or provide other detailed Pacific Islander responses.
  Native Hawaiian-Includes people who indicate their race as Native Hawaiian or report entries such as Part Hawaiian or Hawaiian.
  Samoan-Includes people who indicate their race as Samoan or report entries such as American Samoan or Western Samoan.
  Tongan-Includes people who provide a response such as Tongan or Tonga.
  Other Polynesian-Includes people who provide a response of another Polynesian group, such as Tahitian, Tokelauan, or wrote in a generic term such as Polynesian.
  Guamanian or Chamorro-Includes people who indicate their race as Guamanian or Chamorro or report entries such as Chamorro or Guam.
  Marshallese-Includes people who provide a response such as Marshallese or Marshall Islands.
  Other Micronesian-Includes people who provide a response of another Micronesian group, such as Carolinian, Chuukese, I-Kiribati, Kosraean, Mariana Islander, Palauan, Pohnpeian, Saipanese, Yapese, or wrote in a generic term such as Micronesian.
  Fijian-Includes people who provide a response such as Fijian or Fiji.
  Other Melanesian-Includes people who provide a response of another Melanesian group, such as Guinean, Hebrides Islander, Solomon Islander, or wrote in a generic term such as Melanesian.
  Other Pacific Islander, not specified-Includes respondents who checked the Other Pacific Islander response category on the census questionnaire and did not write in a specific group or wrote in a generic term such as Pacific Islander.

Excerpt from: Social Explorer, U.S. Census Bureau; 2010 Census of Population and Housing, Summary File 1: Technical Documentation, Issued June 2011.
 
Householder
The data on relationship to householder were derived from answers to Question 2, which was asked of all people in housing units. One person in each household is designated as the householder. In most cases, this is the person, or one of the people, in whose name the home is owned, being bought, or rented and who is listed on line one of the questionnaire. If there is no such person in the household, any adult household member 15 years old and over could be designated as the householder.
Households are classified by type according to the sex of the householder and the presence of relatives. Two types of householders are distinguished: a family householder and a nonfamily householder. A family householder is a householder living with one or more individuals related to him or her by birth, marriage, or adoption. The householder and all people in the household related to him or her are family members. A nonfamily householder is a householder living alone or with nonrelatives only.