Data Dictionary: Census 2000
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Survey: Census 2000
Data Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Universe: Total population
Variable Details
P105. Imputation Of Place Of Birth
Universe: Total population
P105003 Not imputed
Aggregation method:
Addition
Relevant Documentation:
Excerpt from: Social Explorer, U.S. Census Bureau; 2000 Census of Population and Housing, Summary File 3: Technical Documentation, 2002.
 
Imputation
When information is missing or inconsistent, the Census Bureau uses a method called imputation to assign values. Imputation relies on the statistical principle of "homogeneity," or the tendency of households within a small geographic area to be similar in most characteristics. For example, the value of "rented" is likely to be imputed for a housing unit not reporting on owner/renter status in a neighborhood with multiunits or apartments where other respondents reported "rented" on the census questionnaire. In past censuses, when the occupancy status or the number of residents was not known for a housing unit, this information was imputed.

Internet Questionnaire Assistance (IQA)
An operation which allows respondents to use the Census Bureau's Internet site to (1) ask questions and receive answers about the census form, job opportunities, or the purpose of the census and (2) provide responses to the short form.

Interpolation
Interpolation frequently is used in calculating medians or quartiles based on interval data and in approximating standard errors from tables. Linear interpolation is used to estimate values of a function between two known values. Pareto interpolation is an alternative to linear interpolation. In Pareto interpolation, the median is derived by interpolating between the logarithms of the upper and lower income limits of the median category. It is used by the Census Bureau in calculating median income within intervals wider than $2,500.

Excerpt from: Social Explorer, U.S. Census Bureau; 2000 Census of Population and Housing, Summary File 3: Technical Documentation, 2002.
 
Place of Birth
The data on place of birth were derived from answers to long-form questionnaire Item 12 which was asked of a sample of the population. Respondents were asked to report the U.S. state, Puerto Rico, U.S. Island Area, or foreign country where they were born. People not reporting a place of birth were assigned the state or country of birth of another family member or their residence 5 years earlier, or were imputed the response of another person with similar characteristics. People born outside the United States were asked to report their place of birth according to current international boundaries. Since numerous changes in boundaries of foreign countries have occurred in the last century, some people may have reported their place of birth in terms of boundaries that existed at the time of their birth or emigration, or in accordance with their own national preference.

The place of birth question for residents of Puerto Rico was identical to the question on the stateside questionnaires. The same code lists were used to code the responses and similar edits were applied.

Nativity
Information on place of birth and citizenship status was used to classify the population into two major categories: native and foreign born. (See "Native" and "Foreign Born" under "Citizenship Status.")

Comparability
The 2000 decennial census place of birth question matches the 1999 and subsequent American Community Survey (ACS) questions. The 1990 decennial census place of birth question matches the 1996-1998 ACS questions. For the 2000 decennial census and post-1998 ACS samples, separate check boxes and write-in spaces were used for people born in the United Sates and those born outside the United States.

Data on place of birth have been collected in each U.S. census since 1850. In prior censuses, the place of birth question asked respondents to report the state or foreign country where they were born. There were no check boxes in prior censuses. Nonresponse to the place of birth question has been imputed to some degree since 1970. For 1970 through 1990, state of birth was imputed for people born in the United States; people born outside the United States were assigned "born abroad, country not specified" or "born in an outlying area, not specified." In 2000, a specific Island Area (referred to as "outlying areas" in previous censuses) or country of birth was imputed.

Data on place of birth for Puerto Rico was asked beginning in 1910. In censuses prior to 2000, the place of birth question asked respondents to report the municipio in Puerto Rico as well as the U.S. state or the foreign country where they were born. Tabulations for those censuses showed people who were born in the same or a different municipio. Municipio of birth was not asked in 2000. Nonresponse was imputed in 1980 and 1990 for all questions, but a specific foreign country was not imputed until 2000.

Parental nativity (birthplace of parents) was asked of a sample of the population in each decennial census between 1870 and 1970. The 1980, 1990, and 2000 decennial censuses instead included a question on ancestry, except for the U.S. Island Areas (such as Guam) which asked the parental nativity question. (See "Ancestry.")