Data Dictionary: Census 1990
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Survey: Census 1990
Data Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Table: H6. Condominium Status By Vacancy Status [11]
Universe: Vacant housing units
Table Details
H6. Condominium Status By Vacancy Status
Universe: Vacant housing units
Relevant Documentation:
Excerpt from: Social Explorer, U.S. Census Bureau; Census of Population and Housing, 1990: Summary Tape File 3 on CD-ROM [machine-readable data files] / prepared by the Bureau of the Census. Washington: The Bureau [producer and distributor], 1991.
 
Condominium Status
The data on condominium housing units were obtained from questionnaire item H18, which was asked on a sample basis at both occupied and vacant housing units. Condominium is a type of ownership that enables a person to own an apartment or house in a development of similarly owned units and to hold a common or joint ownership in some or all of the common areas and facilities such as land, roof, hallways, entrances, elevators, swimming pool, etc. Condominiums may be single-family houses as well as units in apartment buildings. A condominium unit need not be occupied by the owner to be counted as such. A unit classified as "mobile home or trailer" or "other" (see discussion under "Units in Structure") cannot be a condominium unit.

Limitation of the Data
Testing done prior to the 1980 and 1990 censuses indicated that the number of condominiums may be slightly overstated.

Comparability
In 1970, condominiums were grouped together with cooperative housing units, and the data were reported only for owner-occupied cooperatives and condominiums. Beginning in 1980, the census identified all condominium units and the data were shown for renter-occupied and vacant year-round condominiums as well as owner occupied. In 1970 and 1980, the question on condominiums was asked on a 100-percent basis. In 1990, it was asked on a sample basis.

Excerpt from: Social Explorer, U.S. Census Bureau; Census of Population and Housing, 1990: Summary Tape File 3 on CD-ROM [machine-readable data files] / prepared by the Bureau of the Census. Washington: The Bureau [producer and distributor], 1991.
 
Vacancy Status
The data on vacancy status were obtained from questionnaire item C1, which was completed by census enumerators. Vacancy status and other characteristics of vacant units were determined by enumerators obtaining information from landlords, owners, neighbors, rental agents, and others. Vacant units are subdivided according to their housing market classification as follows:

For Rent
These are vacant units offered "for rent," and vacant units offered either "for rent" or "for sale."

For Sale Only
These are vacant units being offered "for sale only," including units in cooperatives and condominium projects if the individual units are offered "for sale only."

Rented or Sold, Not Occupied
If any money rent has been paid or agreed upon but the new renter has not moved in as of the date of enumeration, or if the unit has recently been sold but the new owner has not yet moved in, the vacant unit is classified as "rented or sold, not occupied." For Seasonal, Recreational, or Occasional Use--These are vacant units used or intended for use only in certain seasons or for weekend or other occasional use throughout the year.

Seasonal units include those used for summer or winter sports or recreation, such as beach cottages and hunting cabins. Seasonal units also may include quarters for such workers as herders and loggers. Interval ownership units, sometimes called shared-ownership or time-sharing condominiums, also are included here.

For Migrant Workers
These include vacant units intended for occupancy by migratory workers employed in farm work during the crop season. (Work in a cannery, a freezer plant, or a food-processing plant is not farm work.)

Other Vacant
If a vacant unit does not fall into any of the classifications specified above, it is classified as "other vacant." For example, this category includes units held for occupancy by a caretaker or janitor, and units held for personal reasons of the owner.

Homeowner Vacancy Rate
This is the percentage relationship between the number of vacant units for sale and the total homeowner inventory. It is computed by dividing the number of vacant units for sale only by the sum of the owner-occupied units and the number of vacant units that are for sale only.

Rental Vacancy Rate
This is the percentage relationship of the number of vacant units for rent to the total rental inventory. It is computed by dividing the number of vacant units for rent by the sum of the renteroccupied units and the number of vacant units for rent.

Comparability
Data on vacancy status have been collected since 1940. For 1990, the category, "seasonal/recreational/occasional use" combined vacant units classified in 1980 as "seasonal or migratory" and "held for occasional use." Also, in 1970 and 1980, housing characteristics generally were presented only for year-round units. In 1990, housing characteristics are shown for all housing units.