Data Dictionary: Census 1980
you are here: choose a survey survey data set table details
Survey: Census 1980
Data Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Table: T172. Occupied Housing Units With Householder Of Spanish Origin With Complete Plumbing Facilities For Exclusive Use And Lacking Central Heating Equipment [1]
Universe: Occupied Housing Units With Householder of Spanish Origin With Complete Plumbing Facilities For Exclusive Use And Lacking central heating Equipment
Table Details
T172. Occupied Housing Units With Householder Of Spanish Origin With Complete Plumbing Facilities For Exclusive Use And Lacking Central Heating Equipment
Universe: Occupied Housing Units With Householder of Spanish Origin With Complete Plumbing Facilities For Exclusive Use And Lacking central heating Equipment
Relevant Documentation:
Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; Census of Population and Housing, 1980: Summary Tape File 3 [machine-readable data file] / conducted By the U.S. Bureau of the Census. Washington: Bureau of the Census [producer and distributor], 1982.
 
Housing Unit
A house, apartment, mobile home or trailer, group of rooms, or single room occupied as a separate living quarter or, if vacant, intended for occupancy as a separate living quarter. Separate living quarters are those in which the occupants live and eat separately from any other persons in the building and which have direct access from the outside of the building or through a common hall.

The occupants may be a single family, one person living alone, two or more families living together, or any other group of related or unrelated persons who share living arrangements (except as described in definition of Group Quarters, Persons In). For vacant units, the criteria of separateness and direct access are applied to the intended occupants whenever possible. If that information cannot be obtained, the criteria are applied to the previous occupants. Both occupied and vacant housing units are included in the housing unit inventory, except that recreational vehicles, boats, caves, tents, railroad cars, and the like are included only if they are occupied as someone's usual place of residence. Vacant mobile homes are included provided they are intended for occupancy on the site where they stand. Vacant mobile homes on dealers' sales lots, at the factory, or in storage yards are excluded from the housing inventory. Housing unit status was determined on a complete-count basis.

Historical comparability
The first Census of Housing in 1940 established the "dwelling unit" concept. Although the term became "housing unit" and the definition has been modified slightly in each succeeding census, the 1980 definition is essentially comparable to previous censuses. In 1970, the definition of a housing unit stipulated the occupants to live and eat separately and to have either direct access or complete kitchen facilities. For 1980 direct access is required; the alternative of complete kitchen facilities has been dropped. In 1970 vacant mobile homes were not counted. In 1980 vacant mobile homes are included in the housing inventory if they are intended for occupancy where they stand. Also in 1970 units with 6 or more unrelated persons living together were classified as group quarters; for 1980 that requirement was raised to 10 or more unrelated persons.

See also: "Occupancy Status;" "Tenure;" "Units At Address;" "Units In Structure;" "Year-Round Housing Units".

Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; Census of Population and Housing, 1980: Summary Tape File 3 [machine-readable data file] / conducted By the U.S. Bureau of the Census. Washington: Bureau of the Census [producer and distributor], 1982.
 
Householder
The person who was reported in column 1. This reference person was to be the person or one of the persons in whose name the home was owned or rented. If there was no such person, any adult household member at least 15 years old who was not a roomer, boarder, or paid employee was to be reported in column 1. In complete-count tabulations, the number of householders is the same as the number of households or occupied housing units. In sample tabulations, the numbers may not always be the same because of differences in weighting sample data.

Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; Census of Population and Housing, 1980: Summary Tape File 3 [machine-readable data file] / conducted By the U.S. Bureau of the Census. Washington: Bureau of the Census [producer and distributor], 1982.
 
Spanish Origin
Determined by a complete-count question which asks respondents to self-identify whether they are of Spanish origin or descent. If, when interviewed, the person reported a multiple origin and could not provide a single origin, the origin of the person's mother was used. If a single response was not provided for the person's mother, the first reported origin of the person was used.

Counts of the population by Spanish origin in complete-count tabulations are provisional. Final counts for Spanish origin will be determined after the sample data have been processed. The sample counts will first appear on the tape in STF 3 and in print in Characteristics of Population, General Social and Economic Characteristics, PC80-1-C reports.

Persons marking any one of the four "Spanish" categories, i.e., Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, or other Spanish, are collectively referred to as "persons of Spanish origin."

In certain tabulations, persons of Spanish origin are further classified by type:

Mexican
Persons who indicated "Mexican, Mexican-American, Chicano," or wrote in an entry such as "La Raza."

Puerto Rican
Persons who indicated "Puerto Rican" or wrote in an entry such as "Boricua."

Persons who indicated "Cuban."

Other Spanish
Persons who filled the circle for "other Spanish/Hispanic"; or persons who wrote in an origin or descent associated with Spain, the Dominican Republic, or any Central or South America country except Brazil or a nonspecific Spanish group such as "Spanish surnamed" or "Spanish speaking."

Preliminary evaluations of 1980 census data suggest some limited misreporting of Spanish origin.
Available evidence indicates that the misreporting mw have occurred only in selected areas with relatively small Spanish-origin populations, such as in some Southern States, but it is not apparent in those areas with the largest concentrations of Spanish-origin persons. For a fuller discussion of the reporting in the Spanish-origin item, see the forthcoming 1980 census Supplementary Report, "Persons of Spanish Origin by State: 1980" (PC80-Sl).

Historical comparability
The Spanish-origin question was asked on a l00-percent basis for the first time in 1980. A similar question was asked on the 1970 5-percent sample questionnaire. For 1980, the category "No, not Spanish/Hispanic" appeared first (the corresponding category appeared last in 1970). Also, the terms "Mexican-American" and "Chicano" are added to the term "Mexican." The category "Central or South American," included in 1970, was dropped.

Although a question on Spanish origin was included in 1970, it was not the major identifier used to classify the Hispanic population in the 1970 census as it is in 1980. Depending on the section of the country, 1970 census data for "Persons of Spanish Heritage" were variously defined as "Persons of Puerto Rican Birth or Parentage" (in New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania), as "Persons of Spanish language or Spanish Surname" (in Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas), and as "Persons of Spanish Language" (in the remaining 42 States and the District of Columbia). "Spanish Language" referred to those persons who in 1970 reported Spanish as their mother tongue, as well as persons in families in which the household head or spouse reported Spanish as his or her mother tongue.

Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; Census of Population and Housing, 1980: Summary Tape File 3 [machine-readable data file] / conducted By the U.S. Bureau of the Census. Washington: Bureau of the Census [producer and distributor], 1982.
 
Complete plumbing for exclusive use
Piped hot and cold water, a flush toilet, and a bathtub or shower for exclusive use by household members. All facilities must be in the living quarters, but need not be in the same room. Hot water need not be available continuously. A privy or chemical toilet is not counted as a flush toilet. A bathtub or shower is counted only if it is connected to piped running water.

Lacking complete plumbing for exclusive use:

Complete plumbing facilities, but also used by another household
All facilities preset, but with some or all of the plumbing facilities also regularly used by someone who is not a member of the household. This category also applies if the future occupants of living quarters now vacant would be expected to share the facilities.

Some but not all plumbing facilities
Units with one or two but not all three of these: hot and cold piped water, flush toilet, and bathtub or shower.

No plumbing facilities
Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; Census of Population and Housing, 1980: Summary Tape File 3 [machine-readable data file] / conducted By the U.S. Bureau of the Census. Washington: Bureau of the Census [producer and distributor], 1982.
 
Lacking central heating system
Room heaters with flue
Circulating heaters, convectors, radiant gas heaters, other nonportable room heaters that burn gas, oil, kerosene, or other liquid fuel, and which are connected to a flue, vent, or chimney to remove smoke and fumes.

Room heaters without flue
Any room heater (not portable) that burns gas, oil, kerosene, which is not connected to a flue, vent, or chimney.

Fireplaces, stoves, or portable room heaters
Three kinds of heating methods. The question does not distinguish between them. Fireplaces used as the principal source of heat are counted here, as are ranges and stoves, including parlor stoves, circulating heaters, cookstoves also used for heating, etc. portable room heaters can be picked up and moved around at will, either without limitation (kerosene, oil, gasoline heaters) or within the radius allowed by a flexible gas hose or an electric cord (gas, electric heaters). This classification includes all electric heaters that get current through a cord plugged into an electric wall outlet.

Units with no heating equipment. Most common in the warmest part of the country (Hawaii, Florida, etc.) and seasonal units not intended for winter occupancy.