Data Dictionary: Census 1980
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Survey: Census 1980
Data Source: U.S. Census Bureau and Social Explorer
Table: T58. Median Income for Unrelated Individuals (In 1979 Dollars) [1]
Universe: Unrelated Individuals
Table Details
T58. Median Income for Unrelated Individuals (In 1979 Dollars)
Universe: Unrelated Individuals
Relevant Documentation:
Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; Census of Population and Housing, 1980: Summary Tape File 3 [machine-readable data file] / conducted By the U.S. Bureau of the Census. Washington: Bureau of the Census [producer and distributor], 1982.
 
Median income
To avoid inconsistencies in median income figures for the same population as presented in different reports, all medians for family and household income in the 1980 census are based on the same set of 17 categories available on summary tape files, regardless of the number of intervals shown in various printed tables. Thus, the median shown in a report is frequently more precise than one the user could compute from the intervals shown in the report. Pareto interpolation is used rather than linear interpolation when the width of the income interval is more than $2,500.

For families and unrelated individuals, the median income is based on the distribution of the total number of families and unrelated individuals; whereas for persons, the median income is based on the distribution of persons 15 years old and over with income.

When the median income falls in the terminal category of a distribution, the method of presentation in reports is to show the initial value of the terminal category followed by a plus sign; thus, for example, if the median income falls in the terminal category "$50,000 or more," it is shown as "$50,000 +"in reports or as "$50,001" on STF's.

Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; Census of Population and Housing, 1980: Summary Tape File 3 [machine-readable data file] / conducted By the U.S. Bureau of the Census. Washington: Bureau of the Census [producer and distributor], 1982.
 
Unrelated Individual
An unrelated individual may be (1) a householder living alone or only with persons not related to him or her, (2) a roomer, boarder, partner, roommate, or resident employee unrelated to the householder, or (3) a group quarters member who is not an inmate of *n institution. Classification as an unrelated individual derives from the complete-count question on household relationship. Examples of unrelated individuals include a widow who occupies her house alone or with one or more other persons not related to her, a roomer not related to the householder, a maid living as a member of her employer's household, and a resident staff member in a hospital dormitory. Persons living with one or more relatives in 8 household where the householder is not related to any of them are classified in the census as unrelated individuals; for example, a husband and wife who rent a room from a householder to whom they are not related.

Presentations are shown for the universe of "unrelated individuals 15 years and over" for income and poverty.

Historical comparability
A similar concept was used in 1970.

See also: "Family;" "Household Relationship".