Data Dictionary: Census 1970
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Survey: Census 1970
Data Source: Social Explorer & U.S. Census Bureau
Table: T62. Unemployment Rate For Spanish Population [3]
Universe: Spanish Population 16 Years Old In Civilian Labor Force
Table Details
T62. Unemployment Rate For Spanish Population
Universe: Spanish Population 16 Years Old In Civilian Labor Force
Relevant Documentation:
Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; 1970 Census Users’ Guide; U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1970.
 
Employment status
Ascertained for persons 14 years of age and over from replies to several questions relating to work activity and status during the reference week. These questions were: Did this person work at any time last week (include part-time work such as Saturday job or helping without pay in family business or farm and active duty in the Armed Forces; exclude housework, school work, or volunteer work)? How many hours did he work last week (at all jobs)? Does this person have a job or business from which he was temporarily absent either because of illness, vacation, labor dispute, etc., or because he was on layoff last week? Has he been looking for work during the past four weeks, and if so, was there any reason why he could not take a job last week?

Employed
Civilians 14 years and over who during the reference week were either at work -- who did any work for pay or profit or worked without pay for 15 hours or more on a family farm or business; or with a job but not at work -- were temporarily absent because of reasons such as illness, vacation, etc. The two categories, at work and with a job but not at work, are shown separately in some tabulations.

Unemployed
In 1960, civilians 14 years and over who were neither at work nor with a job but not at work during the reference week but were looking for work within the past 60 days. (Examples of looking for work include registering at an employment office, writing letters of application, etc.) Persons waiting to be called back to a job from which they were laid off or furloughed were also counted among the unemployed.

In 1970, civilians 14 years and over who were neither at work nor with a job but not at work within the past 4 weeks and were available for work during the reference week. Persons waiting to be called back to a job from which they had been laid off or who were waiting to report to a new wage or salary job within 30 days were counted among the unemployed. (Availability for work is indicated by replies to a question -- new in 1970 -- whether there was any reason why the respondent could not take a job last week.)

Experienced unemployed
Those unemployed who indicate in reply to the year last worked question that they have worked at some time in the past.

Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; 1970 Census Users’ Guide; U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1970.
 
Unemployment rate
Represents the number of unemployed as a percent of the civilian labor force. Unemployment rates shown for occupation and industry groups are based on the experienced civilian labor force, since occupation and industry cannot be ascertained for those unemployed who have never worked.

Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; 1970 Census Users’ Guide; U. S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D. C., 1970.
 
Spanish-American population
In the 1960 census, selected tabulations were prepared for the Puerto Rican population in areas outside the five Southwestern States where Spanish surname population was identified.

In the 1970 census, the Spanish-American population is defined differently according to the sample a person is enumerated in and his State of residence. All tabulations except those for 5-percent data are based upon a 15-percent sample, defined as follows:

a. In New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania, persons of Puerto Rican stock , (See 61.131 above).

b. In the five southwestern States (Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas), persons of Spanish language (see 67.1 below) or persons not of Spanish language but of Spanish surname identified by matching with a list of about 8,000 such names.

c. In the remaining States, persons of Spanish language . (See 67.1 below.)

Tabulations of 5-percent data are for persons who report Spanish origin or descent including Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, and other Spanish. Spanish origin or decent is ascertained by means of a 5-percent sample question new with the 1970 census.