Data Dictionary: Census 1960 Tracts Only Set
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Data Source: Social Explorer & U.S. Census Bureau - DUALabs
Table: T162. House Value (White Owner Occupied Housing Units) [11]
Universe: White Owner Occupied Housing Units
Table Details
T162. House Value (White Owner Occupied Housing Units)
Universe: White Owner Occupied Housing Units
Relevant Documentation:
Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; U.S. Censuses of Population and Housing: 1960. Census Tracts. Final Report PHC(1)-11. U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1962.
 
Value
Value is the respondent's estimate of how much the property would sell for on today's market (April 1960). Value data are restricted to owner-occupied units having only one housing unit in the property and no business. Units in multiunit structures and trailers were excluded from the tabulations. In rural territory, units on farms and all units on places of 10 acres or more also were excluded from the value tabulations. For tracts where information on value was tabulated on a complete- count basis (usually in large cities and other urban places), the median was computed on the basis of the tabulation groups shown in the table and the terminal category was $25,000 or more. For these tracts, $25,000+ is the highest median which could be shown. For tracts where information was tabulated from a sample of units, the median was computed on the basis of more detailed categories than are shown in the table and the terminal category was $35,000 or more. Therefore, a median of $25,000+ is not to be interpreted as being necessarily lower than a specific median above $25,000; for example, a median of $25,000+ for a tract in the city may or may not be lower than $29,000 for a tract outside the city.

In the 1950 tract report, value was not published separate for owner-occupied units (except for nonwhite owner-occupied units) but was shown in combination with vacant units available for sale. In rural territory, value data excluded values for far units but may have included some units on places of 10 acres more.

Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; U.S. Censuses of Population and Housing: 1960. Census Tracts. Final Report PHC(1)-11. U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1962.
 
Race and color
The three major race categories distinguished in this report are white, Negro, and other races. Among persons of other races are American Indians, Japanese, Chinese, Filipinos, Koreans, Asian Indians, and Malayans. Negroes and persons of other races taken together constitute nonwhite persons. Persons of Mexican birth or descent who are not definitely Indian or other nonwhite race are classified as white. In addition to persons of Negro and of mixed Negro and white descent, the category Negro includes persons of mixed Indian and Negro descent unless the Indian ancestry very definitely predominates or unless the person is regarded as an Indian in the community.

Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; U.S. Censuses of Population and Housing: 1960. Census Tracts. Final Report PHC(1)-11. U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1962.
 
Occupied housing unit
A housing unit is occupied if it was the usual place of residence for the person or group of persons living in it at the time of enumeration. Included are units occupied by persons who were only temporarily absent (for example, on vacation) and units occupied by persons with no usual place of residence elsewhere.