Data Dictionary: ACS 2010 -- 2012 (3-Year Estimates)
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Data Source: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau
Table: T153. Ancestry - Place of Origin (Total Categories Tallied) For People With One Or More Ancestry Categories Reported [108]
Universe: Total ancestry categories tallied for people with one or more ancestry categories reported
Table Details
T153. Ancestry - Place of Origin (Total Categories Tallied) For People With One Or More Ancestry Categories Reported
Universe: Total ancestry categories tallied for people with one or more ancestry categories reported
Variable Label
T153_001
T153_002
T153_003
T153_004
T153_005
T153_006
T153_007
T153_008
T153_009
T153_010
T153_011
T153_012
T153_013
T153_014
T153_015
T153_016
T153_017
T153_018
T153_019
T153_020
T153_021
T153_022
T153_023
T153_024
T153_025
T153_026
T153_027
T153_028
T153_029
T153_030
T153_031
T153_032
T153_033
T153_034
T153_035
T153_036
T153_037
T153_038
T153_039
T153_040
T153_041
T153_042
T153_043
T153_044
T153_045
T153_046
T153_047
T153_048
T153_049
T153_050
T153_051
T153_052
T153_053
T153_054
T153_055
T153_056
T153_057
T153_058
T153_059
T153_060
T153_061
T153_062
T153_063
T153_064
T153_065
T153_066
T153_067
T153_068
T153_069
T153_070
T153_071
T153_072
T153_073
T153_074
T153_075
T153_076
T153_077
T153_078
T153_079
T153_080
T153_081
T153_082
T153_083
T153_084
T153_085
T153_086
T153_087
T153_088
T153_089
T153_090
T153_091
T153_092
T153_093
T153_094
T153_095
T153_096
T153_097
T153_098
T153_099
T153_100
T153_101
T153_102
T153_103
T153_104
T153_105
T153_106
T153_107
T153_108
Relevant Documentation:
Total Ancestries Reported
Includes the total number of ancestries reported and coded. If a person reported a multiple ancestry such as "German Danish," that response was counted twice in the tabulations--once in the German category and again in the Danish category. Also, if a person reported two different types of German ancestry, such as "Bavarian Hamburger," they would be counted twice in the German category on this type of table. Thus, each line of this table represents the number of reports for that ancestry type, not the number of people (although sometimes that number is the same). Likewise, the sum of the estimates in each of the rows in this type of presentation is not the total population but the total of all responses. The German line in this table is interpreted as "The number of times a German ancestry was reported."

Question/Concept History

The question on ancestry has been asked on the American Community Survey since 1996. The question wording has never changed, although placement of the question changed slightly. Also, the examples listed below the write-in lines changed in 1999, but have remained the same since then.

The question on ancestry was first asked in the 1980 Census. It replaced the question on parental place of birth, in order to include ancestral heritage for people whose families have been in the U.S. for more than two generations. The question also was asked in the 1990 Census and Census 2000.

From 1996 to 1999, the ACS editing system used answers to the race and place of birth questions to clarify ancestry responses of "Indian," where possible. In 2000 and subsequent years, the editing was expanded to aid interpretation of two-word ancestries, such as "Black Irish."

Limitation of the Data

Although some experts consider religious affiliation a component of ethnic identity, the ancestry question was not designed to collect any information concerning religion. The Census Bureau is prohibited from collecting information on religion. Thus, if a religion was given as an answer to the ancestry question, it was coded as an "Other" response.

Beginning in 2006, the population in group quarters (GQ) was included in the ACS. Some types of GQ populations may have ancestry distributions that are different from the household population. The inclusion of the GQ population could therefore have a noticeable impact on the ancestry distribution. This is particularly true for areas with a substantial GQ population.

Comparability

The data are comparable to Census 2000, as long as some caution is used. Response rates to the ancestry question are generally higher for ACS than for Census, and data are never generated for missing ancestry responses, therefore some ancestry groups are reported more heavily in ACS than in Census 2000.

In 2010, there were two major changes to the coding rules. If up to two ancestries were listed, both were coded, even if one was the specific of the other or if one was American. Also, race groups and Hispanic groups were coded with the same priority as non-race andnon-Hispanic groups. For example, "Haitian Black French" would previously have been coded Haitian and French, but now would be coded Haitian and Black.

See the 2012 Code List on the ACS website (http://www.census.gov) for Ancestry Code List.