Data Dictionary: ACS 2010 -- 2012 (3-Year Estimates)
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Data Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Table: C15010G. Field Of Bachelor's Degree For First Major The Population 25 Years And Over (Two Or More Races) [6]
Universe: Universe: TWO OR MORE RACES POPULATION 25 YEARS AND OVER WITH A BACHELOR'S DEGREE OR HIGHER ATTAINMENT
Table Details
C15010G. Field Of Bachelor's Degree For First Major The Population 25 Years And Over (Two Or More Races)
Universe: Universe: TWO OR MORE RACES POPULATION 25 YEARS AND OVER WITH A BACHELOR'S DEGREE OR HIGHER ATTAINMENT
Variable Label
C15010G001
C15010G002
C15010G003
C15010G004
C15010G005
C15010G006
Relevant Documentation:
Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; American Community Survey 2012 3yr Summary File: Technical Documentation.
 
Field of Degree
Field of degree data are used by the National Science Foundation to study the characteristics of the population with science and engineering degrees and occupations.

Data on field of bachelor's degree were derived from answers to Question 12 in the 2012 American Community Survey. This question was asked only to person with a bachelor's degree or higher. Eligible respondents were asked to list the specific major(s) of any bachelor's degree received. This question does not ask for the field of any other type of degree earned (such as master's or doctorate).

An automated computer system coded write-in responses to Question 12 into 192 areas. Clerical coding categorized any write-in responses that could not be autocoded by the computer. Respondents listing multiple fields were assigned a code for each field, with a maximum of 10 fields per respondent.
The majors were further classified into a category scheme detailed in Field of Degree Classification table in Appendix A.

Question/Concept History

The field of degree question first appeared in the 2009 ACS. The inclusion of a field of degree question on the ACS was proposed to provide field of degree data annually for small levels of geography and to assist in building a sampling frame for the National Science Foundation's (NSF) National Survey of College Graduates (NSCG).

Comparability

Tables based on 2010-2012 ACS data are not completely comparable to tables based on 2009 ACS data due to slight changes in the field of degree coding and classifications. More information can be found at http://www.census.gov/hhes/socdemo/education/data/acs/index.html.

This data may be roughly comparable to the National Survey of College Graduates and the National Survey of Recent College Graduates, although the sampling frame and survey instruments differ between the surveys. Field of degree data was also collected in the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) from1984 to 2004. However, these data would not be comparable to ACS due to differences in data collection period, methodology and collection methods. For example, the SIPP only collects data for respondents who are 15 years and older and does not include group quarters.

Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; American Community Survey 2012 3yr Summary File: Technical Documentation.
 
Two or More Races
People may choose to provide two or more races either by checking two or more race response check boxes, by providing multiple responses, or by some combination of check boxes and other responses. The race response categories shown on the questionnaire are collapsed into the five minimum race groups identified by OMB, and the Census Bureau's "Some Other Race" category. For data product purposes, "Two or More Races" refers to combinations of two or more of the following race categories:

  1. White
  2. Black or African American
  3. American Indian or Alaska Native
  4. Asian
  5. Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander
  6. Some Other Race

There are 57 possible combinations (see "Race Combinations" in Appendix A) involving the race categories shown above. Thus, according to this approach, a response of "White" and "Asian" was tallied as Two or More Races, while a response of "Japanese" and "Chinese" was not because "Japanese" and "Chinese" are both Asian responses.