Data Dictionary: ACS 2011 (1-Year Estimates)
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Data Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Table: B27020. Health Insurance Coverage Status And Type By Citizenship Status [17]
Universe: Universe: Civilian noninstitutionalized population
Table Details
B27020. Health Insurance Coverage Status And Type By Citizenship Status
Universe: Universe: Civilian noninstitutionalized population
Relevant Documentation:
Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; American Community Survey 2011 Summary File: Technical Documentation.
 
Insurance for Fire, Hazard, and Flood
The data on fire, hazard, and flood insurance were obtained from Housing Question 18 in the 2011 American Community Survey. The question was asked of owner-occupied units. The statistics for this question refer to the annual premium for fire, hazard, and flood insurance on the property (land and buildings), that is, policies that protect the property and its contents against loss due to damage by fire, lightning, winds, hail, flood, explosion, and so on.

Liability policies are included only if they are paid with the fire, hazard, and flood insurance premiums and the amounts for fire, hazard, and flood cannot be separated. Premiums are reported even if they have not been paid or are paid by someone outside the household. When premiums are paid on other than a yearly basis, the premiums are converted to a yearly basis.

The payment for fire, hazard, and flood insurance is added to payments for real estate taxes, utilities, fuels, and mortgages (both first, second, home equity loans, and other junior mortgages) to derive "Selected Monthly Owner Costs" and "Selected Monthly Owner Costs as a Percentage of Household Income." These data provide information on the cost of home ownership and offer an excellent measure of housing affordability and excessive shelter costs.

A separate question (19d in the 2011 American Community Survey) determines whether insurance premiums are included in the mortgage payment to the lender(s). This makes it possible to avoid counting these premiums twice in the computations.
Median Fire, Hazard, and Flood Insurance
Median fire, hazard, and flood insurance divides the fire, hazard, and flood insurance distribution into two equal parts: one-half of the cases falling below the median fire, hazard, and flood insurance and one-half above the median. Median fire, hazard, and flood insurance is computed on the basis of a standard distribution (see the "Standard Distributions" section under "Appendix A.") Median fire, hazard, and flood insurance is rounded to the nearest whole dollar. (For more information on medians, see "Derived Measures.")

Question/Concept History
The American Community Survey questions have been the same since 1996.

Comparability
Data on fire, hazard, and flood insurance in the American Community Survey can be compared to previous ACS and Census 2000 fire, hazard, and flood insurance data.
Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; American Community Survey 2011 Summary File: Technical Documentation.
 
Citizenship Status (U.S. Citizenship Status)
The data on citizenship status were derived from answers to Question 8. This question was asked about Persons 1 through 5 in the ACS.
Respondents were asked to select one of five categories: (1) born in the United States, (2) born in Puerto Rico, Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands, or Northern Marianas, (3) born abroad of U.S. citizen parent or parents, (4) U.S. citizen by naturalization, or (5) not a U.S citizen. Respondents indicating they are a U.S. citizen by naturalization are also asked to print their year of naturalization. People born in American Samoa, although not explicitly listed, are included in the second response category.

For the Puerto Rico Community Survey, respondents were asked to select one of five categories: (1) born in Puerto Rico, (2) born in a U.S. state, District of Columbia, Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands, or Northern Marianas, (3) born abroad of U.S. citizen parent or parents, (4) U.S. citizen by naturalization, or (5) not a U.S. citizen. Respondents indicating they are a U.S. citizen by naturalization are also asked to print their year of naturalization. People born in American Samoa, although not explicitly listed, are included in the second response category.

When no information on citizenship status was reported for a person, information for other household members, if available, was used to assign a citizenship status to the respondent. All cases of nonresponse that were not assigned a citizenship status based on information from other household members were allocated the citizenship status of another person with similar characteristics who provided complete information. In cases of conflicting responses, place of birth information is used to edit citizenship status. For example, if a respondent states he or she was born in Puerto Rico but was not a U.S. citizen, the edits use the response to the place of birth question to change the respondent's status to "U.S. citizen at birth."
U.S. Citizen
Respondents who indicated that they were born in the United States, Puerto Rico, a U.S. Island Area (such as Guam), or abroad of American (U.S. citizen) parent or parents are considered U.S. citizens at birth. Foreign-born people who indicated that they were U.S. citizens through naturalization also are considered U.S. citizens.
Not a U.S. Citizen
Respondents who indicated that they were not U.S. citizens at the time of the survey.
Native
The native population includes anyone who was a U.S. citizen or a U.S. national at birth. This includes respondents who indicated they were born in the United States, Puerto Rico, a U.S. Island Area (such as Guam), or abroad of American (U.S. citizen) parent or parents.
Foreign born
The foreign-born population includes anyone who was not a U.S. citizen or a U.S. national at birth. This includes respondents who indicated they were a U.S. citizen by naturalization or not a U.S. citizen.

The American Community Survey questionnaires do not ask about immigration status. The population surveyed includes all people who indicated that the United States was their usual place of residence on the survey date. The foreign-born population includes naturalized U.S. citizens, lawful permanent residents (i.e. immigrants), temporary migrants (e.g., foreign students), humanitarian migrants (e.g., refugees), and unauthorized migrants (i.e. people illegally present in the United States).

The responses to this question are used to determine the U.S. citizen and non-U.S. citizen populations as well as to determine the native and foreign-born populations.
Question/Concept History
In the 1996-1998 American Community Survey, the third response category was "Yes, born abroad of American parent(s)." However, since 1999 in the American Community Survey and since the 2005 Puerto Rico Community Survey, the response category was "Yes, born abroad of American parent or parents." In 2008, respondents who indicated that they were a U.S. citizen by naturalization were also asked to print their year of naturalization. Also in 2008, modifications in wording were made to both the third response category (changed from "Yes, born abroad of American parent or parents" to "Yes, born abroad of U.S. citizen parent or parents") and the fifth response category (changed from "No, not a citizen of the United States" to "No, not a U.S. citizen").

Limitation of the Data
Beginning in 2006, the population in group quarters (GQ) is included in the ACS. Some types of GQ populations may have citizenship status distributions that are different from the household population. The inclusion of the GQ population could therefore have a noticeable impact on the citizenship status distribution. This is particularly true for areas with substantial GQ populations.

Comparability
Citizenship can be compared both across ACS years and to Census 2000 data.