Data Dictionary: ACS 2006 -- 2010 (5-Year Estimates)
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Data Source: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau
Table: T122. Poverty Status In 2010 (Asian Alone) [3]
Universe: Asian Alone Population for whom poverty status is determined
Table Details
T122. Poverty Status In 2010 (Asian Alone)
Universe: Asian Alone Population for whom poverty status is determined
Relevant Documentation:
Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; American Community Survey 2006-2010 Summary File: Technical Documentation.
 
Poverty Status in the Past 12 Months
Poverty statistics in ACS products adhere to the standards specified by the Office of Management and Budget in Statistical Policy Directive 14. The Census Bureau uses a set of dollar value thresholds that vary by family size and composition to determine who is in poverty. Further, poverty thresholds for people living alone or with nonrelatives (unrelated individuals) vary by age (under 65 years or 65 years and older). The poverty thresholds for two-person families also vary by the age of the householder. If a family's total income is less than the dollar value of the appropriate threshold, then that family and every individual in it are considered to be in poverty. Similarly, if an unrelated individual's total income is less than the appropriate threshold, then that individual is considered to be in poverty.

How the Census Bureau Determines Poverty Status
In determining the poverty status of families and unrelated individuals, the Census Bureau uses thresholds (income cutoffs) arranged in a two-dimensional matrix. The matrix consists of family size (from one person to nine or more people) cross-classified by presence and number of family members under 18 years old (from no children present to eight or more children present). Unrelated individuals and two-person families are further differentiated by age of reference person (RP) (under 65 years old and 65 years old and over).

To determine a person's poverty status, one compares the person's total family income in the last 12 months with the poverty threshold appropriate for that person's family size and composition (see example below). If the total income of that person's family is less than the threshold appropriate for that family, then the person is considered "below the poverty level," together with every member of his or her family. If a person is not living with anyone related by birth, marriage, or adoption, then the person's own income is compared with his or her poverty threshold. The total number of people below the poverty level is the sum of people in families and the number of unrelated individuals with incomes in the last 12 months below the poverty threshold.

Since ACS is a continuous survey, people respond throughout the year. Because the income questions specify a period covering the last 12 months, the appropriate poverty thresholds are determined by multiplying the base-year poverty thresholds (1982) by the average of the monthly inflation factors for the 12 months preceding the data collection. See the table in Appendix A titled "Poverty Thresholds in 1982, by Size of Family and Number of Related Children Under 18 Years (Dollars)," for appropriate base thresholds. See the table "The 2010 Poverty Factors" in Appendix A for the appropriate adjustment based on interview month.

For example, consider a family of three with one child under 18 years of age, interviewed in July 2010 and reporting a total family income of $14,000 for the last 12 months (July 2009 to June 2010). The base year (1982) threshold for such a family is $7,765, while the average of the 12 inflation factors is 2.24574 Multiplying $7,765 by 2.24574 determines the appropriate poverty threshold for this family type, which is $17,438 Comparing the family's income of $14,000 with the poverty threshold shows that the family and all people in the family are considered to have been in poverty. The only difference for determining poverty status for unrelated individuals is that the person's individual total income is compared with the threshold rather than the family's income.

Individuals for Whom Poverty Status is Determined
Poverty status was determined for all people except institutionalized people, people in military group quarters, people in college dormitories, and unrelated individuals under 15 years old. These groups were excluded from the numerator and denominator when calculating poverty rates.

Specified Poverty Levels
Specified poverty levels are adjusted thresholds that are obtained by multiplying the official thresholds by specific factor. Using the threshold cited from the previous example (a family of three with one related child under 18 years responding in July 2010), the dollar value at 125 percent of the poverty threshold was $ 21,798 ($ 17,438x 1.25).

Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; American Community Survey 2006-2010 Summary File: Technical Documentation.
 
Asian
A person having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent including, for example, Cambodia, China, India, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippine Islands, Thailand, and Vietnam. It includes people who indicate their race as "Asian Indian," "Chinese," "Filipino," "Korean," "Japanese," "Vietnamese," and "Other Asian" or provide other detailed Asian responses.

Asian Indian
Includes people who indicate their race as "Asian Indian" or report entries such as India or East Indian.

Bangladeshi
Includes people who provide a response such as Bangladeshi or Bangladesh.

Cambodian
Includes people who provide a response such as Cambodian or Cambodia.

Chinese, except Taiwanese
Includes people who indicate their race as "Chinese" or report entries such as China or Chinese American.

Filipino
Includes people who indicate their race as "Filipino" or report entries such as Philippines or Filipino American.

Includes people who provide a response such as Hmong or Mong.

Indonesian
Includes people who provide a response such as Indonesian or Indonesia.

Japanese
Includes people who indicate their race as "Japanese" or report entries such as Japan or Japanese American.

Korean
Includes people who indicate their race as "Korean" or report entries such as Korea or Korean American.

Laotian
Includes people who provide a response such as Laotian or Laos.

Malaysian
Includes people who provide a response such as Malaysian or Malaysia.

Pakistani
Includes people who provide a response such as Pakistani or Pakistan.

Sri Lankan
Includes people who provide a response such as Sri Lankan or Sri Lanka.

Taiwanese
Includes people who provide a response such as Taiwanese or Taiwan.

Includes people who provide a response such as Thai or Thailand.

Vietnamese
Includes people who indicate their race as "Vietnamese" or report entries such as Vietnam or Vietnamese American.

Other Asian
Includes people who provide a response of another Asian group not shown separately, such as Iwo Jiman, Maldivian, Mongolian, Okinawan, or Singaporean and who reported two or more specified Asian groups (and no other race).

Other Asian, not specified
Includes respondents who checked the "Other Asian" response category on the census questionnaire and did not write in a specific group or wrote in a generic term such as "Asian," or "Asiatic."