Data Dictionary: ACS 2006 -- 2010 (5-Year Estimates)
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Data Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Table: B24122. Detailed Occupation By Median Earnings In The Past 12 Months (In Inflation-Adjusted Dollars) For The Full-Time, Year-Round Civilian Employed Male Population 16 Years And Over [526]
Universe: Full-time, year-round civilian employed male population 16 years and over with earnings
Table Details
B24122. Detailed Occupation By Median Earnings In The Past 12 Months (In Inflation-Adjusted Dollars) For The Full-Time, Year-Round Civilian Employed Male Population 16 Years And Over
Universe: Full-time, year-round civilian employed male population 16 years and over with earnings
Variable Label
B24122001
B24122002
B24122003
B24122004
B24122005
B24122006
B24122007
B24122008
B24122009
B24122010
B24122011
B24122012
B24122013
B24122014
B24122015
B24122016
B24122017
B24122018
B24122019
B24122020
B24122021
B24122022
B24122023
B24122024
B24122025
B24122026
B24122027
B24122028
B24122029
B24122030
B24122031
B24122032
B24122033
B24122034
B24122035
B24122036
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B24122046
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B24122063
B24122064
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B24122067
B24122068
B24122069
B24122070
B24122071
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B24122100
B24122101
B24122102
B24122103
B24122104
B24122105
B24122106
B24122107
B24122108
B24122109
B24122110
B24122111
B24122112
B24122113
B24122114
B24122115
B24122116
B24122117
B24122118
B24122119
B24122120
B24122121
B24122122
B24122123
B24122124
B24122125
B24122126
B24122127
B24122128
B24122129
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B24122131
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B24122133
B24122134
B24122135
B24122136
B24122137
B24122138
B24122139
B24122140
B24122141
B24122142
B24122143
B24122144
B24122145
B24122146
B24122147
B24122148
B24122149
B24122150
B24122151
B24122152
B24122153
B24122154
B24122155
B24122156
B24122157
B24122158
B24122159
B24122160
B24122161
B24122162
B24122163
B24122164
B24122165
B24122166
B24122167
B24122168
B24122169
B24122170
B24122171
B24122172
B24122173
B24122174
B24122175
B24122176
B24122177
B24122178
B24122179
B24122180
B24122181
B24122182
B24122183
B24122184
B24122185
B24122186
B24122187
B24122188
B24122189
B24122190
B24122191
B24122192
B24122193
B24122194
B24122195
B24122196
B24122197
B24122198
B24122199
B24122200
B24122201
B24122202
B24122203
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B24122205
B24122206
B24122207
B24122208
B24122209
B24122210
B24122211
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B24122213
B24122214
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B24122222
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B24122239
B24122240
B24122241
B24122242
B24122243
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B24122297
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B24122299
B24122300
B24122301
B24122302
B24122303
B24122304
B24122305
B24122306
B24122307
B24122308
B24122309
B24122310
B24122311
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B24122314
B24122315
B24122316
B24122317
B24122318
B24122319
B24122320
B24122321
B24122322
B24122323
B24122324
B24122325
B24122326
B24122327
B24122328
B24122329
B24122330
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B24122396
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B24122399
B24122400
B24122401
B24122402
B24122403
B24122404
B24122405
B24122406
B24122407
B24122408
B24122409
B24122410
B24122411
B24122412
B24122413
B24122414
B24122415
B24122416
B24122417
B24122418
B24122419
B24122420
B24122421
B24122422
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B24122424
B24122425
B24122426
B24122427
B24122428
B24122429
B24122430
B24122431
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B24122435
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B24122511
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B24122513
B24122514
B24122515
B24122516
B24122517
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B24122522
B24122523
B24122524
B24122525
B24122526
Relevant Documentation:
Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; American Community Survey 2006-2010 Summary File: Technical Documentation.
 
Occupation
Occupation describes the kind of work a person does on the job. Occupation data were derived from answers to questions 45 and 46. Question 45 asks: "What kind of work was this person doing?" Question 46 asks: "What were this person's most important activities or duties?"

These questions were asked of all people 15 years old and over who had worked in the past 5 years. For employed people, the data refer to the person's job during the previous week. For those who worked two or more jobs, the data refer to the job where the person worked the greatest number of hours. For unemployed people and people who are not currently employed but report having a job within the last five years, the data refer to their last job.

These questions describe the work activity and occupational experience of the American labor force. Data are used to formulate policy and programs for employment, career development and training; to provide information on the occupational skills of the labor force in a given area to analyze career trends; and to measure compliance with antidiscrimination policies. Companies use these data to decide where to locate new plants, stores, or offices.

Coding Procedures
Occupation statistics are compiled from data that are coded based on the Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) Manual: 2010, published by the Executive Office of the President, Office of Management and Budget. Census occupation codes, based on the 2010 SOC, provide 539 specific occupational categories, for employed people, including military, arranged into 23 major occupational groups.

Respondents provided the data for the tabulations by writing on the questionnaires descriptions of the kind of work and activities they are doing. Clerical staff in the National Processing Center in Jeffersonville, Indiana converted the written questionnaire descriptions to codes by comparing these descriptions to entries in the Alphabetical Index of Industries and Occupations.

Some occupation groups are related closely to certain industries. Operators of transportation equipment, farm operators and workers, and healthcare providers account for major portions of their respective industries of transportation, agriculture, and health care. However, the industry categories include people in other occupations. For example, people employed in agriculture include truck drivers and bookkeepers; people employed in the transportation industry include mechanics, freight handlers, and payroll clerks; and people employed in the health care industry include janitors, security guards, and secretaries.

Editing Procedures
Following the coding operation, a computer edit and allocation process excludes all responses that should not be included in the universe, and evaluates the consistency of the remaining responses. The codes for occupation are checked for consistency with the industry and class of worker data provided for that respondent. Occasionally respondents supply occupation descriptions that are not sufficiently specific for precise classification, or they do not report on these questions at all. Certain types of incomplete entries are corrected using the Alphabetical Index of Industries and Occupations.

If one or more of the three codes (occupation, industry, or class of worker) is blank after the edit, a code is assigned from a donor respondent who is a "similar" person based on questions such as age, sex, educational attainment, income, employment status, and weeks worked. If all of the labor force and income data are blank, all of these economic questions are assigned from a "similar" person who had provided all the necessary data.

Question/Concept History
Occupation data have been collected during decennial censuses since 1850. Starting with the 2010 Census, occupation data will no longer be collected during the decennial census. Long form data collection has transitioned to the American Community Survey. The American Community Survey began collecting data on occupation in 1996. The questions on occupation were designed to be consistent with the 1990 Census questions on occupation. American Community Survey questions on occupation have remained consistent between 1996 and 2010.

Limitation of the Data
Beginning in 2006, the population in group quarters (GQ) was included in the ACS. Some types of GQ populations have occupational distributions that are different from the household population. The inclusion of the GQ population could therefore have a noticeable impact on the occupational distribution in some geographic areas with a substantial GQ population.

Data on occupation, industry, and class of worker are collected for the respondent's current primary job or the most recent job for those who are not employed but have worked in the last 5 years. Other labor force questions, such as questions on earnings or work hours, may have different reference periods and may not limit the response to the primary job. Although the prevalence of multiple jobs is low, data on some labor force items may not exactly correspond to the reported occupation, industry, or class of worker of a respondent.

Comparability
Comparability of occupation data was affected by a number of factors, primarily the system used to classify the questionnaire responses. Changes in the occupational classification system limit comparability of the data from one year to another. These changes are needed to recognize the "birth" of new occupations, the "death" of others, the growth and decline in existing occupations, and the desire of analysts and other users for more detail in the presentation of the data. Probably the greatest cause of noncomparability is the movement of a segment from one category to another. Changes in the nature of jobs, respondent terminology, and refinement of category composition made these movements necessary.

ACS data from 1996 to 1999 used the same occupation classification systems used for the 1990 census; therefore, the data are comparable. Since 1990, the occupation classification has been revised to reflect changes within the Standard Occupational Classification (SOC). The SOC was updated in 2000 and these changes were reflected in the Census 2000 occupation codes. The 2000-2002 ACS data used the same occupation classification systems used for Census 2000, therefore, the data are comparable. Because of the possibility of new occupations being added to the list of codes, the Census Bureau needed to have more flexibility in adding codes. Consequently, in 2002, census occupation codes were expanded from three-digit codes to four-digit codes. For occupation, this entailed adding a "0" to the
end of each occupation code. The SOC was revised once more in 2010. Based on the 2010 SOC changes, Census codes were revised resulting in a net gain of 30 Census occupation codes (from 509 occupations to 539 occupations). Most of these changes were concentrated in information technology, healthcare, printing, and human resources occupations. For more information on occupational comparability across classification systems, please see technical paper #65: The Relationship Between the 1990 Census and Census 2000 Industry and Occupation Classification Systems. For information on the 2010 SOC and Census codes, please see the summary of 2010 changes and the Census 2002 to 2010 occupation crosswalk.

See the 2010 Code List for Occupation Code List.

See also, Industry and Class of Worker.

Median Earnings
The median divides the earnings distribution into two equal parts: one- half of the cases falling below the median and one-half above the median. Median earnings is restricted to individuals 16 years old and over with earnings and is computed on the basis of a standard distribution. (See the "Standard Distributions" section under "Derived Measures.") Median earnings figures are calculated using linear interpolation. (For more information on medians and interpolation, see "Derived Measures.")

Full-Time, Year-Round Workers
All people 16 years old and over who usually worked 35 hours or more per week for 50 to 52 weeks in the past 12 months.