Data Dictionary: ACS 2007 -- 2009 (3-Year Estimates)
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Data Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Table: C22007. Receipt Of Food Stamps/Snap In The Past 12 Months By Family Type By Number Of Workers In Family In The Past 12 Months [29]
Universe: Families
Table Details
C22007. Receipt Of Food Stamps/Snap In The Past 12 Months By Family Type By Number Of Workers In Family In The Past 12 Months
Universe: Families
Relevant Documentation:
Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; American Community Survey 2007-2009 Summary File: Technical Documentation.
 
General Information
  • Contact List: To obtain additional information on these and other American Community Survey (ACS) subjects, see the list of Census 2000/2010 Contacts on the Internet at www.census.gov/contacts/www/c-census2000.html.
  • Scope: These definitions apply to the data collected in both the United States and Puerto Rico. The text specifically notes any differences. References about comparability to the previous ACS years refer only to the ACS in the United States. Beginning in 2006, the population in group quarters is included in the data tabulations.
  • Historical Census Comparability: For additional information about the data in previous decennial censuses, see www.census.gov/prod/cen2000/doc/sf4.pdf
Appendix B and subject definitions for American Community Survey years prior to 2005.

  • Weighting Methodology: The weighting methodology in the 2006 ACS was modified in order to ensure consistent estimates of occupied housing units, households, and householders. For more information on the 2006 weighting methodology changes, see User Notes on the ACS website (www.census.gov/acs). There were no significant changes to the 2007 or 2008 weighting methodology. Beginning in 2009, the weighting methodology has changed to include the use of controls for total population for incorporated places and minor civil divisions.
  • For subject definitions from previous years, visit www.census.gov/acs.


Family Households
A family consists of a householder and one or more other people living in the same household who are related to the householder by birth, marriage, or adoption. All people in a household who are related to the householder are regarded as members of his or her family. A family household may contain people not related to the householder, but those people are not included as part of the householder's family in tabulations. Thus, the number of family households is equal to the number of families, but family households may include more members than do families. A household can contain only one family for purposes of tabulations. Not all households contain families since a household may be comprised of a group of unrelated people or of one person living alone - these are called nonfamily households. Families are classified by type as either a "married-couple family" or "other family" according to the sex of the householder and the presence of relatives. The data on family type are based on answers to questions on sex and relationship that were asked of all people.

  • Married-Couple Family - A family in which the householder and his or her spouse are listed as members of the same household.
  • Other Family: Male Householder, No Wife Present - A family with a male householder and no spouse of householder present.
  • Female Householder, No Husband Present - A family with a female householder and no spouse of householder present.
Family households and married-couple families do not include same-sex married couples even if the marriage was performed in a state issuing marriage certificates for same-sex couples. Same sex couple households are included in the family households category if there is at least one additional person related to the householder by birth or adoption.

Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; American Community Survey 2007-2009 Summary File: Technical Documentation.
 
Worker
This term appears in connection with several subjects: employment status, journey-to-work questions, class of worker, weeks worked in the past 12 months, and number of workers in family in the past 12 months. The meaning varies and, therefore, should be determined in each case by referring to the definition of the subject in which it appears. When used in the concepts "workers in family" and "full-time, year-round workers," the term "worker" relates to the meaning of work defined for the "work experience" subject.