Data Dictionary: ACS 2006 -- 2008 (3-Year Estimates)
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Data Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Table: C25073. Units In Structure By Gross Rent As A Percentage Of Household Income In The Past 12 Months [21]
Universe: Universe: Renter-occupied housing units
Table Details
C25073. Units In Structure By Gross Rent As A Percentage Of Household Income In The Past 12 Months
Universe: Universe: Renter-occupied housing units
Variable Label
C25073001
C25073002
C25073003
C25073004
C25073005
C25073006
C25073007
C25073008
C25073009
C25073010
C25073011
C25073012
C25073013
C25073014
C25073015
C25073016
C25073017
C25073018
C25073019
C25073020
C25073021
Relevant Documentation:
Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; American Community Survey 2006-2008 Summary File: Technical Documentation.
 
Units in Structure
The data on units in structure (also referred to as "type of structure") were obtained from Housing Question 1 in the 2008 American Community Survey. The question was asked at occupied and vacant housing units. A structure is a separate building that either has open spaces on all sides or is separated from other structures by dividing walls that extend from ground to roof. In determining the number of units in a structure, all housing units, both occupied and vacant, are counted. Stores and office space are excluded. The data are presented for the number of housing units in structures of specified type and size, not for the number of residential buildings.
Mobile Home
Both occupied and vacant mobile homes to which no permanent rooms have been added are counted in this category. Mobile homes used only for business purposes or for extra sleeping space and mobile homes for sale on a dealer's lot, at the factory, or in storage are not counted in the housing inventory.
1-Unit, Detached
This is a 1-unit structure detached from any other house, that is, with open space on all four sides. Such structures are considered detached even if they have an adjoining shed or garage. A one-family house that contains a business is considered detached as long as the building has open space on all four sides. Mobile homes to which one or more permanent rooms have been added or built also are included.
1-Unit, Attached
This is a 1-unit structure that has one or more walls extending from ground to roof separating it from adjoining structures. In row houses (sometimes called townhouses), double houses, or houses attached to nonresidential structures, each house is a separate, attached structure if the dividing or common wall goes from ground to roof.
2 or More Apartments
These are units in structures containing 2 or more housing units, further categorized as units in structures with 2, 3 or 4, 5 to 9, 10 to 19, 20 to 49, and 50 or more apartments.
Boat, RV, Van, Etc.
This category is for any living quarters occupied as a housing unit that does not fit the previous categories. Examples that fit this category are houseboats, railroad cars, campers, and vans. Recreational vehicles, boats, vans, tents, railroad cars, and the like are included only if they are occupied as someone's current place of residence.
Question/Concept History
The 1996-1998 American Community Survey question provided the response category, "a mobile home or trailer." Starting in 1999, the ACS response category dropped "or trailer" to read as "a mobile home."
Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; American Community Survey 2006-2008 Summary File: Technical Documentation.
 
Gross Rent as a Percentage of Household Income
Gross rent as a percentage of household income is a computed ratio of monthly gross rent to monthly household income (total household income divided by 12). The ratio is computed separately for each unit and is rounded to the nearest tenth. Units for which no rent is paid and units occupied by households that reported no income or a net loss comprise the category, "Not computed."
Median Gross Rent as a Percentage of Household Income
This measure divides the gross rent as a percentage of household income distribution into two equal parts: one-half of the cases falling below the median gross rent as a percentage of household income and one-half above the median. Median gross rent as a percentage of household income is computed on the basis of a standard distribution. (See the "Standard Distributions" section under "Derived Measures.") Median gross rent as a percentage of household income is rounded to the nearest tenth. (For more information on medians, see "Derived Measures.")