Data Dictionary: ACS 2008 (1-Year Estimates)
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Data Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Table: B08133. Aggregate Travel Time To Work (In Minutes) Of Workers By Time Leaving Home To Go To Work [15]
Universe: Workers 16 years and over who did not work at home
Table Details
B08133. Aggregate Travel Time To Work (In Minutes) Of Workers By Time Leaving Home To Go To Work
Universe: Workers 16 years and over who did not work at home
Relevant Documentation:
Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; American Community Survey 2008 Summary File: Technical Documentation.
 
Aggregate Travel Time to Work (in Minutes)
Aggregate travel time to work is calculated by adding all of the travel times (in minutes) for workers who did not work at home. Aggregate travel times of workers having specific characteristics also are computed. The aggregate travel time is subject to rounding, which means that all cells in a matrix are rounded to the nearest 5 minutes. (For more information, see "Aggregate" under "Derived Measures.")
Excerpt from: Social Explorer; U.S. Census Bureau; American Community Survey 2008 Summary File: Technical Documentation.
 
Time Leaving Home to Go to Work
The data on time leaving home to go to work were derived from answers to Question 32. This question was asked of people who indicated in Question 28 that they worked at some time during the reference week, and who reported in Question 30 that they worked outside their home. The departure time refers to the time of day that the respondent usually left home to go to work during the reference week. (See "Reference Week.")
Limitation of the Data
Beginning in 2006, the group quarters (GQ) population is included in the ACS. Some types of GQ populations may have departure time distributions that are different from the household population. The inclusion of the GQ population could therefore have a noticeable impact on the departure time distribution. This is particularly true for areas with a substantial GQ population.

Question/Concept History
Beginning in 1999, the American Community Survey questions differ from the 1996-1998 questions only in the format of the skip instructions.